Sharing insights and achievements in workers’ comp

By Kendra DePaul, BWC Other States Coverage Manager

In workers’ comp, we sure do love our acronyms. One of my favorites is the IAIABC which states for the International Association of Industrial Accident Board and Commission.

The IAIABC is an association that brings together workers’ compensation administrators, regulators and leaders to discuss policy and regulatory issues affecting workers’ compensation systems around the world.

Workers’ compensation is a state-based system and although rules and laws vary between states, we also have a lot in common. IAIABC’s annual convention provided an opportunity for the various states (and countries) to discuss common challenges, solutions and ways to impact the system.

The conference was held in Portland, Oregon this year and it was my first year attending. The topics discussed were familiar to those in the industry, including disability management and return to work, employee vs. independent contractor classification, promotion of health and safety, and the like.

A common topic that often comes up at these meetings is employee recruiting and how we are going to replace the knowledge and experience of many talented workers’ comp staff who may be retiring soon. The focus is often on how jobs in the workers’ compensation field have many good things to offer: stability, career advancement, opportunities for growth, the ability to help people, and the need to recruit millennials.

Since I am a millennial, I will say that all those things ring true and I very much enjoy spending my days in the workers’ comp world. I was honored this year to be recognized by IAIABC as a NextGen recipient.

The award recognizes professionals under the age of 40 who are making an impact on workers’ compensation.

As part of the award, I participated in a session titled A Conversation with the NextGen where we shared our thoughts and insights on the industry.

I had a great time meeting the other NextGen recipients and discussing the future of workers’ comp.

Although we are from different states and work in many different roles, there are common themes of needing to improve communication, leverage data and move towards a customer-focused system. There was agreement that for a lot of people, having a workers’ compensation claim is a very personal and potentially life-altering situation and it is important to not lose the people in the process.

If you’re looking for a career path in an industry on the verge of making important improvements, look no further!

Striving for world class

By Bill Teets, BWC Communications Director

It is no secret that successful organizations have a strong sense of direction and purpose. At the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation, we want to be a world class insurer.

We have a clear mission to “protect Ohio’s workers and employers through the prevention, care and management of workplace injuries and illnesses at fair rates.” Keep people safe. Make them better when they’re hurt. Do it effectively to not over-burden business. We also have a core set of values—service, simplicity and savings—that guide us.

While these are essential to being world class, they’re not enough. As communications director for BWC, I spend much of my time discovering all the great things happening here and sharing them with the outside world. There are so many stories to tell. Great investing has helped us return $3 billion in rebates over the last several years. Ohio’s injury rates are below the national average and our claims are at record lows. We’re finding ways to speed care to the injured and our nationally recognized pharmacy management program has drastically reduced opioid usage among injured workers.

What I’ve learned from telling these stories is that world class organizations have world class people. Our mission and values may guide us, but ultimately, it is the people that deliver on those promises. Several recent accolades prove my point.

Recently, our Chief of Enterprise Services, Shadya Yazback was named a C-Suite Award Winner by Columbus Business First. In their own words, “the C-Suite Awards recognizes Central Ohio’s top executives for their contribution and commitment to the community and their outstanding professional performance.”

This year’s 19 winners were selected by a panel of business school professors in Ohio. Among her achievements at BWC is the implementation of a multi-year, multi-million dollar replacement of our core claims and policy management systems—systems used by more than half our 1,800 employees to serve Ohio’s injured workers and employers. It was not always a smooth transition, but as the driver of the process she proved world-class people are able to adapt and keep an organization driving toward a common goal.

Kendra DePaul is another example of our world-class staff. Kendra has been named as one of 11 NexGen award winners by the International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions (IAIABC). She achieved this accolade for leading Ohio’s effort to build our Other States Coverage and managing the program. Because of this program, Ohio employers who do business in other states have options that make life easier when it comes to covering their employees.

That same organization awarded our pharmacy department the second annual IAIABC Innovation Award. That entry, “Saving Lives — Building a Model Pharmacy Program Amid a Deadly Epidemic” reflects Ohio’s efforts to reduce opioid abuse and excessive prescribing of the painkillers while building a pharmacy program that’s recognized as a leader in the industry today. Because of the pharmacy department efforts, led by John Hanna, who just retired, we have reduced the number of injured workers dependent on opioids from 8,000 in 2011 to 4,100 today. You can point to policies, but it was John and his people who took the initiative to make this reality.

Three world-class accomplishments. Three world-class people. And that’s just the tip of these iceberg. At BWC, we have 1,800 other dedicated individuals who work every day to help keep workplaces safe, get the injured back to their lives, and help reduce bureaucratic obstacles to their success. Not a bad place to work.

Collaboration among states improves program

By Kendra DePaul, BWC Other States Coverage Manager

In late August, underwriting consultant Julie Phillips and I traveled to the User’s Conference for Other States Coverage. The conference was hosted by United States Insurance Services (USIS) who is the vendor we work with, along with Zurich American Insurance to offer workers’ comp coverage outside the state of Ohio.

As I have mentioned in previous blog posts, workers’ compensation can be complicated for employers working in multiple states as each state has different rules and laws that must be followed. The Other States Coverage program allows BWC and several other state’s funds to assist their policyholders with securing proper coverage nationwide.

The purpose of the annual conference is to get together with the other states to discuss program results, best practices and troubleshoot common questions.

There are six other state funds in the program and in 2016 about 3,000 policies were issued collectively. The majority of the policies are small, with 68% being under $5,000 in premium. Although there are some large accounts, the collective group has primarily embraced this program to offer coverage options for smaller employers.

Around the meeting table it was clear that the reason each of the state funds offered this option is because they cared deeply about their policyholders and wanted to assist them with being successful. The issue with coverage and claims in a multitude of different states is not unique to Ohio. Each of these state’s funds have dealt with similar issues of employees hired in one state and injured in another, or with employers being fined for not having coverage in a specific state. It is also clear that some states are harder to work with than others and require multiple forms to be filed when policies are issued there.

A big push at this User’s Conference is for each state to share lessons learned or tools created to make the program more efficient for each user. One example of this has to do with schedule rating forms. Schedule rating is an available premium adjustment on private workers’ comp policies. An insurer can offer debits or credits for unique conditions of an employer.

For every policy we issue we are required to complete a form stating whether a schedule rating was used and the specific reasons why. Most states have a separate form for this purpose and if you issue a policy in multiple states, multiple forms are often required.

In an effort to reduce the time spent completing these forms, Julie Phillips took the initiative to create an Excel tool where policy information only has to be entered once and then is populated to multiple forms and saved as a PDF document. This new format has allowed our underwriters to spend much less time completing individual forms. Julie presented the Excel tool at the User’s Conference so they could begin taking advantage of it as well.

I am thankful for Julie’s hard work in completing this and I am continuously impressed by the collaborative spirit of all the state funds involved in the program. Each of them has offered assistance as we continue to improve our Other States Coverage program in Ohio. We all have the same goal of providing excellent customer service to our policyholders. Working together, I am confident we will do just that.

Continuing the workers’ comp conversation

By Kendra DePaul, BWC Other States Coverage Manager

Oklahoma: home to Will Rogers, Route 66 and CompSource Mutual Insurance Company – host of the 2017 Annual Conference of the American Association of State Compensation Insurance Funds (AASCIF). AASCIF is an association of workers’ compensation state funds from 26 different states, plus 8 workers’ compensation boards in Canada.

The conference was held in Oklahoma City in late June and hundreds of attendees gathered from around the country to discuss hot topics in the workers’ comp industry.

As was mentioned in a previous post, three BWC employees are members of AASCIF’s committees tasked with planning session topic and finding speakers for the annual conference. Michael Rienerth, Ergonomics Technical Advisor is on the Safety and Health Committee. Bill Teets, Communications Director is on the Communications Committee and I am on the Enterprise Risk Management and Underwriting Committee.

Along with planning sessions, committee members were also asked to share their knowledge and experience at track sessions at this year’s conference. Mike presented on violence in the workplace. Bill presented on crisis communication and the strategy of thought leadership. And I presented on state to state coverage conundrums.

Shadya Yazback, our Chief of Enterprise Services, also presented a session on preparing the business for large scale IT changes.

Additional sessions were held on the use of predictive analytics, the state of the economic, emerging technologies, telemedicine, and other topics affecting the industry as a whole.

Two of the main session speakers, Richard A. Clarke, Former National Security Advisor and Frank Abagnale, American Security Advisor (you may know him from the movie Catch Me If You Can), discussed the importance of safeguarding our personal information and the constant threat of cyber security.

We also heard the inspiring story of an Oklahoma City Bombing survivor and the friendship that developed with her rescuer. The story reinforced the amazing capacity of people to heal from wounds (both physical and metal) and the important role of the people who support them through their recovery.

In addition to the speakers, AASCIF holds an annual Communication Awards competition. I am happy to report that BWC won two awards this year. We received 2nd place in the Excellence in the Writing category for the “Trek through Nepal” article. And we won 1st place in the Print Marketing Piece category for a marketing piece we created for Other States Coverage. Working with the communications department, we targeted our marketing to a specific group of employers based on their size and the type of work they do. The marketing piece generated several inquires and we ended up issuing three policies, meaning we received a return on our investment.

As always, the conference was a whirlwind of activities. In addition to educational sessions, we spent time getting to know members of the other states workers’ comp funds, discussing ways to improve our operations and even having a little fun. Since we were in Oklahoma, we couldn’t close the trip without experiencing a rodeo and visiting the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum. Yee Haw!

We’re looking for a few great innovators

By Erik Harden, BWC Public Information Officer

Has your organization developed a new piece of equipment, tool or process to reduce risk to your workforce? Have you made changes to an existing method to improve safety and health in your workplace?  If so, you could earn a cash prize for your ingenuity by applying for a BWC Safety Innovation Award.

The application period for our 2018 Safety Innovation Awards is now open. We don’t consider whether the innovation is high-tech, low-tech or no-tech. We’re simply seeking solutions that reduce risk, create cost savings, and that have potential application to other workplaces, industries or operations.

If you are an Ohio employer – or know one – that has taken an innovative step to reduce risk of injury or illness, check out the award criteria and application.

We’re accepting applications until Sept. 30, 2017. Five finalists will receive cash awards, ranging from $1,000 to $6,000 and statewide recognition at the Ohio Safety Congress & Expo in Columbus March 7 to 9, 2018.

Last year’s finalists included innovations such as hydroblasting robots, a scaffold caddy and a pneumatically-operated cylinder clamp. You can check out descriptions and videos of all the finalists’ innovations here.

We hope seeing the past finalists and their ideas will inspire you to apply for the 2018 awards. If you have any questions about the program, email bwcsafetyinnovations@bwc.state.oh.us or call 1-800-644-6292.

We look forward to seeing your innovative approaches to eliminating workplace risks and hazards!

Safety council’s busy spring season!

By Michelle Francisco, BWC Safety Council Program Manager

The spring of each year is always a busy season for Ohio’s safety council programs, and this year was no exception.

Ohio’s 82 safety councils collect semi-annual accident statistics from members to recognize them for their accomplishments in safety.

Certificates of recognition are then presented at monthly safety council meetings in March, April and May. The Mid-Ohio Valley Safety Council is pictured above.

BWC presented more than 5,000 certificates statewide to recognize employers for their efforts in preventing occupational injuries. Employers can earn one of four awards:

Group – presented to the company with the lowest incident rate in its type of work in the local community;

100% – presented to any company that works the entire year without an incident resulting in a day or more away from work;

Achievement – presented to any company that reduces its incident rate by at least 25 percent from one year to the next;

Special – presented to any company that works over six months and over 500,000 hours without an incident resulting in a day or more from work.

At the Logan County Area Safety Council meeting, I presented multiple awards to representatives of Honda Transmission Manufacturing.


 

 

 

 

 

 

Members of the Columbiana Area Safety Council pose with their certificates below.

The recognition certificates presented reflect countless hours of effort and dedication to creating and maintaining safe workplaces in Ohio. All Ohio employers enrolled and actively participating in an Ohio safety council are to be commended for their efforts.

Each year on the first Monday in May, Ohio’s safety council sponsors and leaders meet in Central Ohio to hear program updates, network with one another and share best practices in safety council program management.


At this year’s conference, BWC Administrator/CEO Sarah Morrison (above) and Division of Safety & Hygiene Superintendent Abe Tarawneh (left) both shared timely updates on the importance of safety in managing workers’ compensation costs and BWC’s continuing emphasis and investment in safety in Ohio.

One of the most popular activities of each year’s conference is the speed networking, which allows participants to meet a variety of representatives from other safety councils to discuss trends, challenges and solutions for creating and maintaining successful safety council programs.

Finally, at each year’s Safety Council Leaders Conference, the four safety councils are recognized as the highest achieving programs in the state with Safety Council of the Year awards.

Administrator Morrison presented the Grand Award for first place to the Summit County Safety Council.

Ross County Safety Council, sponsored by the Chillicothe-Ross Chamber of Commerce, took home the second place award.

In third place was the Mid-Ohio Valley Safety Council, sponsored by the Marietta Area Chamber of Commerce. 

Earning the fourth place award was the Ashtabula County Safety Council. (Left)  

Five additional safety councils earned an honorable mention, including:

Stark County Safety Council, Portage County Safety Council, Orrville Area Safety Council, Ottawa County Safety Council and Sandusky County Safety Council.

Responsible for the programming for this year’s conference were committee members Briana Hood, Dessie Rogers, Mike Thompson, and Deb Katzenmeyer.

Get involved in the excitement of the Ohio Safety Council program and enroll today!

Workers’ Comp: Adapt or fall behind

By Kendra DePaul, BWC Other States Coverage Manager

I had the opportunity to attend the National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI) 2017 Annual Issues Symposium earlier this month. NCCI presents a word that describes the industry as a whole and sets the tone for the conference each year. That word this year was “adapting.”

As Bill Donnell, president and chief executive officer for NCCI, kicked off the conference, he explained how important it is for workers’ compensation to stay relevant in a world that is consistently changing. He provided Blockbuster Video as an example of a company that failed because they did not see the changes coming and adjust to keep up with the times.

As technology was moving towards streaming television and videos, Blockbuster Video did not anticipate how these changes were going to affect them and actually turned down an opportunity to purchase Netflix. This inability to see the writing on the wall contributed to their ultimate demise.

The theme that resonated throughout the conference is that we as an industry cannot afford to get stuck where we are. If we want to continue to be successful in serving our customers, we have to continue to adapt. Bill believes the industry has the capacity and talent to weave the changing technology into our everyday activities and predicted continued growth and development well into the future.

Reflecting on this need to adapt, I began to think about all the things BWC is doing to adapt and ensure our customers are getting the services they desire. The first thing that came to mind is the initiative to update BWC’s website to make it more user friendly. BWC’s website has A LOT of good information. But in a time when attention spans are getting shorter by the day, no one wants to comb through piles of information to find what they need.

Our customers want us to know what they need and put it front and center on the website so that they can find it quickly. I know the Administrator is particularly excited about the new website and the ability to provide information to customers in the way they desire. There is talk about a mobile app, push notification and other needed updates. I know I pay my bills, check into flights and generally manage my life from my mobile phone so I am excited to see how the new web changes will streamline and simplify interactions for our customers.

I am also excited about BWC’s recent announcement to invest $6 million for a new health and wellness program for small Ohio employers. We only get one body to live in, so investing in our health is essential to a happy and healthy life.  In addition, the research continues to show that employees who get injured are much more likely to have positive outcomes and return to work if they are healthy pre-injury.  Investing in Ohio’s workforce wellness is another great example of how BWC is adapting to serve its customers.

Internally, we have recently launched the Nimble and Agile workgroup to continue discussions on what we can do to stay relevant and adapt with the changing world. The workgroup is working on crisis management planning to ensure BWC resources are ready in the event of a policyholder crisis. They are also exploring ways to foster innovation and encourage staff to collaborate on improvements. Finally, they are planning the launch of a new internal wellness program to encourage BWC staff to strive for wellness of mind, body and spirit.

“Adapting” is an appropriate word to describe the workers’ comp industry. I’m pleased my employer recognizes and understands the importance of the word. We’ll continue to work toward a more flexible system ready to adjust to our customers’ changing needs.

I look forward to hearing next year’s word. No matter what it is, I suspect Ohio will be well prepared to meet whatever challenge it presents.