Did you know? BWC offers free OSHA courses

Make safety training a priority this year with free Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) courses offered by BWC!

As partners in workplace safety and health, we want you and your employees to have a safe 2020. Specifically, we want to help you prevent workplace injuries by giving your employees up-to-date training.

We have quite a few OSHA-10 and OSHA-30 workshops scheduled in 2020 at various sites across Ohio. See the table below for specific dates and locations. To sign up for one of our courses, visit the BWC Learning Center. Did we mention the courses are free?

OSHA-10

Date Location Specific Workshop
Feb. 4-5 Canton Service Office Construction Safety Basics
Feb. 19-20 Portsmouth Service Office Construction Safety Basics
March 3-4 Oak Harbor (Ottawa County Resource Center) Construction Safety Basics
March 18-19 Youngstown Service Office Industry Safety Basics
March 25-26 Perrysburg (Bowling Green State University) Industry Safety Basics
April 1-2 Pickerington (Ohio Center for Occupational Safety and Health) Industry Safety Basics
April 21-22 Dayton Service Office Industry Safety Basics
April 22-23 Lima (The Ohio State University at Lima) Industry Safety Basics
May 20-21 Lima (The Ohio State University at Lima) Construction Safety Basics
June 2-3 Cleveland (Indiana Wesleyan University) Industry Safety Basics
June 24-25 Portsmouth Service Office Industry Safety Basics

OSHA-30

Date Location Specific Workshop
Jan. 27-31 Dayton Service Office Construction Safety Principles
Jan. 27-31 Youngstown Service Office Construction Safety Principles
Feb. 3-7 Pickerington (Ohio Center for Occupational Safety and Health) Construction Safety Principles
Feb. 10, 18-21 Canton Service Office Construction Safety Principles
Feb. 10-14 Cincinnati Service Office Industry Safety Principles
Feb. 24-28 Cleveland (Indiana Wesleyan University) Construction Safety Principles
April 13-17 Perrysburg (Bowling Green State University) Construction Safety Principles

High-hazard employers find success with BWC consulting program

By Ben Smigielski, BWC Occupational Safety & Hygiene Fellow

Egelhof Controls Corporation worked with BWC’s OSHA On-Site consultants to help it attain Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program accreditation.

It’s amazing how 10 words – We’re strictly consultative. We cannot issue citations or propose penalties – can ease the minds of employers when they hear them from a BWC OSHA on-site consultant.

When most employers hear the word “OSHA,” they instantly think of the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration, big government, and costly fines and citations. But that’s not the case with BWC’s OSHA On-Site Consultation Program. We are dedicated to providing no-cost consultation on a voluntary basis.

That’s right, no cost. Just click on your county for contact information and give us a call.

This program gives priority to smaller private employers in high-hazard industries, often with incredible success.

How it works

An employer requests this confidential consultation through BWC. Employers can ask for an inspection of their entire workplace, or just focus on one or more specific areas of concern. This allows them to tailor the consultation to their liking, involving them in the process rather than just simply running through a rigid process. The program also offers:

  • Safety program assistance.
  • Safety and hygiene training or seminars.
  • Printed and electronic resources.

Using these services helps employers improve safety and health management systems. It also helps them recognize and remove hazards from the workplace, which reduces worker injury and illness rates. In turn, this can lead to a variety of other positive effects, such as decreasing workers’ comp costs, improving worker morale, and increasing productivity.

Creating success stories

One such success story is Egelhof Controls Corporation of Toledo. The company achieved Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP) accreditation from OSHA in March 2018. The company earned the distinction after working for months with BWC consultants to make changes to safety programs, work processes, and management’s role in safety.

SHARP accreditation recognizes employers with exemplary safety and health programs. It acknowledges their success in instilling health and safety practices (along with implementing a culture of health and safety) in their workplace.

Perhaps we could help your company accomplish the same. We are here to help. If you think implementing safety measures might be too burdensome and costly, consider this question: What are the costs of NOT investing in safety?

To request an OSHA On-site consultation, submit the request online. Please have your BWC policy number ready. A safety consultant will contact you within two business days. 

‘Walking down grain’ is a deadly operation (Don’t do it)

Two workplace deaths in July heighten awareness for grain bin safety

By Bruce Loughner CSP, BWC Technical Safety Advisor

This is my second blog post on deadly grain bin accidents this year, and I hope it’s the last.

But as a safety professional for the state of Ohio, I feel obligated to spread the word on grain bin safety precautions following the tragic loss of two lives at a Toledo grain facility July 19.

I don’t know all the details surrounding the accident that claimed the lives of a 29-year-old Rossford man and a 56-year-old Perrysburg man that hot Friday afternoon, but according to news reports the two men died when they climbed inside a grain silo to break up compacted grain and unplug a blocked hole. This is a hazardous process known as “walking down grain.” The two were engulfed in grain and suffocated.

OSHA prohibits “walking down grain” and similar practices in flat storage structures. Regulations also limit employee access, entry and work in any grain storage bin. When permitted, the standards require strict hazard control measures and training for all employees assigned tasks that require bin entry. OSHA has a variety of resources that explain the deadly hazards associated with grain handling operations.

In a March 2019 BWC Blog post, I spoke about a grain bin accident that occurred years ago when three young boys entered a grain bin to break up stored corn so that it could flow. The two employees in Toledo were performing a similar task.

News reports indicate emergency responders had early contact with one of the trapped workers. Unfortunately, the rescue turned into a recovery operation as time passed and the grain suffocated the two employees. The hazards are well known, and environmental conditions are ripe for grain to bridge and develop air pockets.

Two other recent grain-bin deaths in Ohio involved a 20-year-old worker being caught in an auger and a 68-year-old farmer being engulfed in a bin. Each death was preventable. New innovations in equipment with proper training and knowledge can be used to complete the task without ever entering the grain bins.  All grain handling deaths and serious injuries can be prevented.

As the first line of defense, BWC encourages eliminating hazards through engineering control measures, including mechanical raking devices, proper ventilation for dust and mold control, and the use of vibrating mechanisms to break up bridged grain.

Prior to entering a grain bin, take the following precautions:

  • Conduct a job safety analysis to identify specific hazards and to determine the best course of action for eliminating or controlling the hazards using engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment.
  • Treat the grain bin as a confined space and develop specific procedures for determining if it is safe to enter, how to enter, how to work safely in the space, and how to get out safely in the event of an emergency. Develop a communication and rescue plan.
  • Develop a program and procedures for lock out and tag out of all energy sources. Never allow employees to enter the grain bin while the auger is activated or when it could become activated.
  • Provide the appropriate personal protective equipment (e.g. respirator, safety harness, and lifeline) depending on the hazards that might be encountered. Train employees how to use it properly.
  • Contact the local fire department for assistance in developing rescue procedures. Practice self-rescue and other rescue procedures.
  • Train and educate employees engaged in grain bin operations by emphasizing hazards and safety procedures.

Whether you operate a small farm or a large handling and storage operation for exporting grain, a BWC consultant can assist you.

We provide on-site consultations to assess hazards, identify engineering and other control measures, and make you aware of federal and state requirements.

In addition, we can help with the development of site-specific safety procedures, training and educational resources to address the deadly hazards associated with grain bin operations.

Check out this BWC brochure for additional information. For more on the July 19 tragedy, read this story from the Toledo Blade.

Feeling the heat? Stay safe with preventive measures

By Isayah Hickson, BWC Occupational Safety & Hygiene Fellow

Click on graphic for full size image. Courtesy of the National Weather Service.

A glance at the thermometer tells the story: we’re officially in the dog days of summer.

This means we’re in the hottest part of the season and at greater risk of heat-related illness such as heat exhaustion and heat stroke. So, what’s the difference between the two?

Heat exhaustion is a result of the body
overheating. Common symptoms may include heavy sweating, dizziness, fainting, and rapid pulse.

Heat stroke is a medical emergency. It occurs when the body’s core temperature rises too high and its natural cooling system stops working. Symptoms may include an altered mental state, lack of perspiration, rash, muscle cramps, exhaustion, and stroke.

Who is at risk?
The risk of heat illness is greatest for workers in hot/humid environments and outdoor workers. People who are obese, have high blood pressure, heart disease, and those over 65 years old may be more susceptible to heat illnesses.

Prevention methods
Below are helpful reminders when working in heat and humidity.

  • Drink one glass (or equivalent) of water every 15 to 30 minutes worked, depending on conditions.
  • Take frequent breaks (five to 10 minutes per hour) to cool down and replenish.
  • Know how prescription drugs you take react to sun and heat exposure.
  • Avoid alcohol, caffeinated beverages, and non-prescribed drugs.
  • Build up tolerance to the heat (called acclimatization) by initially limiting the physical activity and exposure to the heat and gradually increasing these over a one- to two-week period.
  • Manage work activities and pair them to employees’ physical conditions. Adapt work and pace to the weather.
  • Use special protective gear (if available), such as cooling garments and cooling vests on “early entry” workers.
  • Know and review first-aid techniques for heat-related conditions.

There’s an app for that
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) have developed a smart phone app – the OSHA-NIOSH Heat Safety Tool – to assess heat stress risk where outdoor activities are planned. You can download it on the App Store or Google Play.

It’s no accident: BWC safety staffer earns industry award

By Tony Gottschlich, Public Information Officer

When industrial hygienist Phillip Rauscher talks about his job with the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC), he sounds like a third-grader on the morning of a school field trip to the zoo.

“Every day is a field trip for me,” said the smiling five-year veteran of BWC’s Division of Safety & Hygiene. “I visit employers all over northwest Ohio to identify and remediate safety hazards so no one gets sick or injured on the job. It’s extremely satisfying work, and I never get tired of it.”

He’s apparently good at it, too. That’s why Rauscher earned this year’s John J. Bloomfield Award from the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). The award recognizes a young industrial hygienist who pursues the problem of occupational health hazards primarily by doing fieldwork.

In a news release, the ACGIH noted Rauscher’s “outstanding contributions to the industrial hygiene profession” and “exemplary” impact as a practitioner and a leader.

“I was grinning ear to ear when I was notified about the award,” said Rauscher, 31, the fourth BWC employee to capture the award in its 40-year history and the first in 21 years. “On top of that, it was my birthday, so it was a pretty good day.”

Rauscher, who is based in BWC’s Toledo service office, was honored May 22 at the ACGIH’s conference in Minneapolis. He was nominated by BWC colleague Jeff Hutchins, a 1993 Bloomfield award winner.

“It is obvious that this is more than just a job to him — he has a real passion for occupational safety and health that comes through in his interaction with peers and customers alike,” said Hutchins, who manages the Safety and Hygiene division’s technical advisors. “He has that rare combination of extremely high-level technical skills and great interpersonal skills that allow him to effectively communicate complex concepts to a wide variety of audiences.”

Making a difference

Rauscher said he knew early in his BWC career that he could make a positive difference in the lives of working Ohioans.

In his first weeks on the job, for instance, he visited a metal grinding business cited by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) for producing excessive metal dust without proper ventilation.

“It was so bad the employees were wearing respirators all the time while they were working,” he said. “But respirators aren’t a perfect system. You think you’re protected but it’s not 100 percent protection.”

Rauscher provided guidance on a ventilation system that improved the workplace air quality, met OSHA standards and allowed workers to remove their respirators — all at no extra charge to the employer. BWC’s safety services are covered by employer premiums.

BWC Industrial Hygienist Phil Rauscher measures noise levels in a Toledo factory earlier this month.

“A private consultant would charge up to $300 an hour and cost thousands by the day,” Rauscher noted.

Among several academic and industry credentials, Rauscher earned his bachelor’s degree in public health with a minor in chemistry from Youngstown State University. He earned a master’s in environmental/ occupational health from the University of Toledo. He’s currently working online for a master’s degree in advanced safety engineering management from The University of Arkansas, Birmingham.

Born in Cleveland and raised in Mansfield, Rauscher lives in Bowling Green today on an 11-acre farm with his wife Mollie and two children.

Other Bloomfield winners from BWC include Scott Hayes (1998) and Mark Ashworth (1990).

Learn fall protection and prevention! Attend a BWC stand-down event

By Erik Harden, BWC Public Information Officer

In 2017, there were 971 construction fatalities nationwide; 366 of them resulted from falls from elevation.

Additionally, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) again lists fall protection in construction as its most frequently cited standard.

To raise awareness and reduce injuries and fatalities, OSHA promotes its annual National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls. The stand-down encourages employers across the nation to hold events in conjunction with the multi-day event, May 6-10 this year. As always, the stand-down encourages employers to pause during their workday for topic discussions, safety demonstrations, and trainings in hazard recognition and fall prevention.

We have scheduled four FREE training events open to the public during the week of the stand-down. We’ve listed information for each below.

Garfield Heights event

  • When: 8 a.m. to Noon May 7
  • Where: BWC’s Garfield Heights Service Office – 4800 E. 131st, Garfield Heights, OH 44131
  • Event details: Presentations by experts from T. Allen Incorporated, The Albert M. Higley Co., Werner Ladder, Honeywell and the Cleveland OSHA Area Office
  • Register: Visit the BWC Learning Center and enter Stand-Down Event in the search field then enroll for the Garfield Heights event.

 Mansfield event

  • When: 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. May 7
  • Where: MHS Industrial Supply – 70 Sawyer Parkway, Mansfield, OH 44903
  • Event details: Presentation by experts from FallTech; co-hosted by MHS Industrial Supply
  • Register: Visit the BWC Learning Center and enter Stand-Down Event in the search field then enroll for the Mansfield event.

 Pickerington event

  • When: 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. May 10
  • Where: BWC’s Ohio Center for Occupational Safety and Health – 13430 Yarmouth Drive, Pickerington, OH 43147
  • Event details: Presentations by experts from Guardian Fall Protection, LBJ Inc. and the Columbus OSHA Area Office
  • Register: Visit the BWC Learning Center and enter Stand-Down Event in the search field then enroll for the Pickerington event.

Youngstown event

  • When: 7:30 – 9 a.m. May 7
  • Where: Boak & Sons, Incorporated – 75 Victoria Road, Austintown, OH 44515
  • Event details: Presentation by experts from 3M and a drop demonstration truck; co-hosted by Boak & Sons, Incorporated
  • Register: Email David Costantino or call 330-301-5825; email David Loughner or call 216-538-9720

We may add more events in the coming weeks. Also, don’t forget the BWC Library offers an extensive collection of audiovisual materials related to fall hazards and fall prevention. Additionally, we offer year-round classes throughout Ohio to address fall protection requirements.

It’s not too late for your company or organization to plan a stand-down event. We’re here if you need help planning your activity. Just call 1-800-644-6292 for assistance.

Learn, plan, and act to prevent grain bin tragedies

By Bruce Loughner CSP, BWC Technical Safety Advisor

I recall hearing about a grain bin accident that occurred years ago, but it has stuck with me ever since. Three young boys entered a grain bin with the task of breaking up the corn inside to keep it flowing.

In the end, only one boy came out alive. In an ordeal that lasted 13 hours, the survivor could only watch as the grain engulfed the other two young men.

Tragedies like this are entirely preventable with proper training, equipment, and knowledge. That’s why we’re joining the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and other industry organizations to raise awareness during Stand Up for Grain Safety Week, March 25-29. This program focuses on preventing grain bin fatalities and injuries in Ohio and across the U.S.

Grain bins are deadly. Below are steps you can take to save lives.

  1. Learn the hazards of grain bins – When I think of grain bin hazards, the first thing that comes to mind is engulfment. However, there are several other hazards associated with grain bins, such as:
  • Toxic atmospheres.
  • Combustible environments.
  • Excessive noise.
  • Fall hazards (inside and outside the bin).
  • Mechanical equipment hazards (e.g., augers and sweeps).
  • Heat stress and confined space risks.
  1. Plan the work Can workers do a task without entering the bin? Planning to keep employees out of bins and preventing exposures is the best plan. Farmers need proper training to identify hazards. Automated systems (e.g., moisture and temperature sensors, bin vibrators, remote-controlled sweep augers, etc.) can help employees perform required tasks from outside the bin. Incorporating these systems and other new innovations in the work plan is essential. 
  1. Act on implementing the safety plan Make sure to train all workers and review the associated hazards by conducting a job hazard analysis for each specific task. Gather and use the necessary personal protective equipment. If entering a grain storage facility, follow the confined space requirements and include a rescue procedure.

At BWC, we’ve also developed a brochure with additional information about grain bin hazards and resources you can use to protect employees working in and around grain bins.

Please join us in spreading the word about the importance of grain bin safety this week and all year long.