Convicted of fraud, nurse ordered to pay BWC $23K in restitution

Felony conviction for Shaker Heights woman

A Cleveland-area nurse was ordered to pay the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) more than $23,000 in restitution April 7 after BWC discovered her working while collecting injured-worker benefits.

A Franklin County judge ordered Tanya Houston, 46, of Shaker Heights to pay $23,489 to BWC and serve five years of probation in lieu of a one-year prison sentence after she pleaded guilty to a fifth-degree felony count of workers’ compensation fraud.

“We’re here to provide compensation for people who can’t work because of an on-the-job injury, not supplement the income of fraudsters cheating our system,” said BWC Interim Administrator John Logue. According to BWC’s Special Investigations Department, Houston was working as a therapeutic program nurse when she injured herself in June 2019. As she collected disability benefits from BWC for the injury, she continued to work for a second employer without informing BWC, the employer where her injury occurred, or her physician and other treatment providers.

To report suspected workers’ compensation fraud, call 1-800-644-6292 or visit bwc.ohio.gov.

Video surveillance exposes Sidney couple’s scheme to defraud BWC

Agency closes 11 cases in June, July

The Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) closed 11 cases involving workers’ compensation fraud and related charges in June and July, bringing total convictions for BWC to 47 for calendar year 2020.

“Workers’ compensation fraud can happen anywhere in Ohio,” said BWC Administrator/CEO Stephanie McCloud. “That’s why we have dedicated investigators in every corner of the state to uncover folks — whether they’re employers, injured workers or medical providers — who try to cheat the system.”

Among the June cases is a Sidney, Ohio, couple sentenced on felony charges related to workers’ compensation fraud after a BWC investigation found the husband mowing lawns, using a snow blower, and chopping wood while claiming to be permanently and totally disabled from work.

A Shelby County judge sentenced David Juillerat on June 8 to five years of probation in lieu of jail time and a fine of $1,000 for his conviction on a reduced charge of attempted tampering with records, a fourth-degree felony. Juillerat’s wife, Wendy Juillerat, was sentenced three days earlier on a similar charge, attempted complicity to tampering with records, also a fourth-degree felony. A judge sentenced her to five years of probation in lieu of jail time and to pay court costs.

David Juillerat applied to BWC in 2018 for permanent total disability benefits, claiming a work injury left him unable to drive a car or walk without the assistance of a walker. Acting on a tip that he might be faking his injury, agents with BWC’s Special Investigations Department surveilled David for several weeks in 2019. They filmed him on multiple occasions entering and leaving medical offices with a walker. Away from a medical office, however, agents filmed him walking, shopping, working on his car, chopping wood, and other activities, all without the use of a cane or walker.

As for Wendy Juillerat, agents say she admitted to helping her husband complete his application for permanent total disability and accompanied him to numerous doctor’s appointments in which she would exaggerate his physical limitations in order for the disability to be granted.

Based on BWC’s investigation, David Juillerat’s application for disability benefits was denied in late 2019, saving BWC an estimated $233,668 in benefits over the projected life of the claim.

Other cases in June and July include:

Joseph Ferguson of Toledo

Ferguson pleaded guilty July 24 in Franklin County Common Pleas Court to one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a first-degree misdemeanor, after a BWC investigation revealed he was working as a web development supervisor while receiving benefits from BWC from October 2017 to January 2018. The judge sentenced Ferguson to five years of community control and ordered him to pay restitution of $6,473 to BWC. If he violates the terms of his community control, he will serve 60 days in jail.

Ruth Asamoah of Columbus

On July 13, Asamoah pleaded guilty to one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a fifth-degree felony, for working while receiving BWC disability benefits. BWC investigators found Asamoah worked for eight employers, performing the same or similar jobs she was doing when she was injured. A Franklin County judge ordered her to pay $15,020 in restitution and sentenced her to an 11-month jail sentence, suspended for five years of probation.

Jeffrey Berkley of Taylor, Michigan

BWC investigators found Berkley working as a driver, transporting cars around the Midwest, while receiving BWC benefits from July 2014 to September 2014. On July 7, Berkley pleaded guilty in Franklin County to one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a first-degree misdemeanor. The judge sentenced him to a 12-month suspended jail sentence and ordered him to pay restitution of $2,668 to BWC. Berkley paid the full amount of restitution to the clerk of courts prior to the plea.

Marguerite Cervantes of Perrysburg

Cervantes pleaded guilty July 2 to one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a fifth-degree felony, in the Franklin County Court of Common Pleas. A BWC investigation revealed Cervantes had returned to work as a clinical nurse from April to October 2016 while collecting temporary total disability benefits. The judge sentenced her to an 11-month suspended jail sentence, five years of probation, and ordered her to pay restitution of $16,885.

Angela Berardelli of North Canton

A BWC investigation revealed Berardelli was working at a restaurant while receiving BWC benefits from January 2016 to June 2017. On June 30, Berardelli pleaded guilty to one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a first-degree misdemeanor. She received a sentence of 90 days in jail suspended for 12 months of community control. The judge ordered Berardelli to pay restitution of $10,194 to BWC. She made a payment of $6,500 at the time of plea.

Patricia Black of Cincinnati

Black pleaded guilty June 16 in Franklin County to one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a fifth-degree felony. An investigation by BWC found Black working as an office cleaner while receiving BWC benefits from January 2018 to October 2018. Black was ordered to pay $18,407 in restitution and sentenced to 12 months in prison, suspended for three years of non-reporting community control.

To report suspected workers’ compensation fraud, call 1-800-644-6292 (Option 4, Option 0, Option 1) or visit bwc.ohio.gov.

Ohio business owners owe more than $800K following fraud-related convictions

Three Northeast Ohio men owe the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) more than $800,000 after investigators discovered they were operating their businesses without workers’ compensation coverage.

“These business owners learned the hard way they cannot operate their business without workers’ compensation coverage, and now they owe us hundreds of thousands of dollars,” said BWC Administrator/CEO Stephanie McCloud. “I’m pleased our investigators stopped these employers from continuing to break the law and cheat our system.”

William H. Foster III

William H. Foster III, owner of American Construction Group LTD, pleaded guilty Feb. 11 in a Summit County courtroom to a second-degree misdemeanor of obstructing official business after failing to work with BWC to reinstate his policy. A judge sentenced Foster to credit for time served in jail and to follow the payment agreement he made with the BWC and the Ohio Attorney General’s Office to reinstate his policy. Foster owes BWC more than $360,000 in past premiums and penalties.

Paul “Bob” Collier Jr.

In Stark County, Paul “Bob” Collier Jr. and Miklos Fioretto pleaded guilty on Jan. 17 and Feb. 5, respectively, to a fourth-degree felony charge of workers’ compensation fraud for failing to maintain coverage on their East Sparta, Ohio, business.

Investigators discovered that Fioretto and Collier changed the name of their pallet manufacturing business to avoid paying past premiums and penalties associated with the business.

Both men were sentenced to three years of community service. A condition of probation is to pay BWC restitution of $458,125.

In other news: A Columbus woman was ordered to pay BWC $6,941 in restitution on Tuesday after pleading guilty to a first-degree misdemeanor charge of workers’ compensation fraud.

BWC investigators discovered Jamia Smith, 39, working for a staffing firm while concealing that information from BWC to continue collecting disability benefits. A judge also sentenced Smith to three years of probation in lieu of six months in jail. To report suspected workers’ compensation fraud, call 1-800-644-6292 or visit www.bwc.ohio.gov.

Fraudulent billing leads to occupational therapist’s conviction

Agency secures 6 fraud-related convictions in December   

A northeast Ohio occupational therapist was convicted last month for felony workers’ compensation fraud for billing the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) for treatment services she did not provide to patients.

Susanna Kagalitskaya Freedman, of Euclid, pleaded guilty Dec. 17 in a Cuyahoga County court to a fifth-degree felony count of workers’ compensation fraud. The judge sentenced her to five years of probation and a $2,500 fine. Additionally, Freedman was permanently decertified to treat BWC patients for claim-related injuries.

“As an agency, we expect providers to give superior care and service to injured workers,” said BWC Administrator/CEO Stephanie McCloud. “This particular provider obviously did not meet the standard of care injured workers deserve and she cheated our system.”

Numerous red flags in Freedman’s billing practices and treatment notes sent to BWC prompted BWC’s Special Investigations Department (SID) to initiate an investigation starting in October 2017. Investigators discovered Freedman was falsifying documents, indicating services had been rendered when they had not. BWC would then pay for the substandard care based on the falsified information Freedman provided.

SID secured five other fraud-related convictions in December, bringing calendar year 2019’s total to 94.

Jeffrey Jakob of Toledo
Jakob pleaded guilty Dec. 31 in Toledo Municipal Court to one count of failure to comply, a second-degree misdemeanor, after BWC found he was operating his business, J.A. Jakob Marine Contracting, with lapsed coverage since March 2015. BWC agents made multiple attempts to assist Jakob in getting his coverage reinstated, but he failed to do so. The judge ordered him to one year of probation and to comply with a reinstatement payment plan with the Ohio Attorney General’s office. He must also remain current on installment payments to BWC.

Harold Brown of Bellefontaine
Brown pleaded guilty Dec. 23 to three second-degree misdemeanor charges of failure to comply for running his business, Brown’s Lawn & Tree Service, without workers’ compensation coverage. BWC investigators discovered his BWC policy had been lapsed since September 2010. Brown received 30 days in jail (suspended), a $250 fine, and was ordered to make regular payments to BWC and the Attorney General until a reinstatement payment plan was paid in full. The current amount due on Brown’s BWC policy is approximately $133,000.

Marie Olinger of Delta
On Dec. 17, a Franklin County judged ordered Olinger to three years of community control for working while receiving more than $2,800 in disability benefits from BWC. The investigation found Olinger had returned to work at the Dental Center of Northwest Ohio between January and March 2017 while receiving temporary total disability benefits.

Rodney Filibeck of Mansfield
Filibeck pleaded guilty Dec. 16 in Franklin County Common Pleas Court to one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a first-degree misdemeanor. After receiving an anonymous tip, BWC investigators determined Filibeck was working construction jobs while receiving BWC disability benefits between September 2016 and June 2017. The judge handed down a 60-day jail sentence, suspended for 12 months of community control and ordered him to pay $2,519 in restitution to BWC.

Deangelo Speed of Shaker Heights
Speed pleaded guilty Dec. 2 in a Franklin County courtroom to a fifth-degree felony count of workers’ compensation fraud. BWC agents found Speed working as a truck driver while collecting BWC benefits from Oct. 20, 2015, through Jan. 27, 2017. The judge ordered Speed to pay BWC $7,599 in restitution and court costs by March 2, 2020. The judge also sentenced Speed to a six-month jail sentence, suspended for six months of probation.

To report suspected workers’ compensation fraud, call 1-800-644-6292 or visit bwc.ohio.gov.

BWC secures 14 fraud-related convictions in October

Fraudsters owe BWC more than $283,000 in restitution

The Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) secured 14 fraud-related convictions in October, with those convicted owing BWC a combined $283,146 in restitution.

Those convicted include injured workers found working while collecting disability benefits, family members collecting their deceased parent’s compensation benefits, and business owners whose coverage had lapsed.

“When people cheat BWC or fail to cover their own employees, they are cheating the injured workers who really need our help and the employers in our system that follow the law,” said BWC Administrator/CEO Stephanie McCloud.

In order of most recent court appearance, those convicted in October include:

Bruce Starkey of Cincinnati, Ohio
Starkey pleaded guilty Oct. 17 and was sentenced in Hamilton County Common Pleas Court Nov. 4 on one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a fifth-degree felony. Starkey received 100 hours of community service and was required to pay BWC full restitution for the $1,459 in permanent total disability benefits he took from his mother’s bank account after she passed. He failed to inform BWC of her passing and wrote 15 checks, forging his mother’s signature.

Cecil Piner of Xenia, Ohio
Piner pleaded guilty Oct. 31 in Franklin County Common Pleas Court on one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a fifth-degree felony, after BWC found him driving a school bus while receiving $17,901 in disability benefits. He was sentenced to five years’ probation in lieu of 12 months in jail and ordered to pay court costs and full restitution.

Kyle Foreman of New Carlisle, Ohio
Foreman pleaded guilty Oct. 30 in Clark County Municipal Court on two counts of failure to comply, both second-degree misdemeanors. His coverage for Kyle S. Foreman Enterprises had lapsed since November 2017, and he failed to pay the premiums before taking his company into bankruptcy. He was ordered to pay a $100 fine and court costs for each count.

Michelle Smith of Cincinnati, Ohio
Smith, 57, pleaded guilty Oct. 23 to one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a fifth-degree felony, after BWC discovered she owned and ran two businesses, Expression Unique LLC and Later in Life Brides, while collecting BWC benefits for workers deemed permanently and totally disabled. A Franklin County judge ordered Smith to pay BWC $40,873 dollars in restitution and serve five years of non-reporting community control (probation). If she violates her probation, she must serve a year in prison.

Louis Tombazzi of Cleveland, Ohio
BWC found Tombazzi owed the agency approximately $75,000 in premiums after letting the policy lapse for his business, Garda Architectural Fabrication. He pleaded guilty Oct. 16 in Cleveland Municipal Court to one count of failure to comply, a second-degree misdemeanor, and was ordered to serve 90 days in jail (suspended), pay a $400 fine, and serve two years’ probation. He also was ordered to report monthly to the court his effort to reduce or pay off his BWC obligation.

Natalia Daniels of Concord Township, Ohio
Daniels pleaded guilty Oct. 16 to one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a first-degree misdemeanor, after receiving $3,600 in BWC disability benefits while working as a bus driver for a senior living facility and as a laborer for an insurance company. A judge ordered her to pay full restitution to BWC and serve 18 months of probation in lieu of a 180-day jail sentence.

Vicki Aloisio of West Chester, Ohio
Aloisio was convicted Oct. 11 on two counts of failure to comply, both second-degree midemeanors, for failing to carry BWC coverage on her business, Richard Aloisio Trucking Inc., despite numerous BWC attempts to assist her. Aloisio owes $28,000 in past-due premiums and penalties. Sentencing in a Butler County courtroom is scheduled for Dec. 6.

Ahmad Al-thamra of Akron, Ohio
Al-thamra pleaded guilty Oct. 10 in Akron Municipal Court to two counts of failure to comply, both second-degree misdemeanors, for failing to maintain workers’ compensation coverage on his business, The Family Corner Store. He was ordered to pay $300 in fines and ordered to pay court costs and obey all laws for one year.

Jason Gaschler of Cheswick, Pennsylvania
Gaschler pleaded guilty Oct. 10 of one count of theft, a first-degree misdemeanor, for operating a construction company, General License Contracting, in Pennsylvania while receiving $6,864 in BWC benefits. He was sentenced to one day in jail (time served) and made full restitution at the time of his hearing.

Jason Rissner of Rockford, Ohio
Rissner pleaded guilty Oct. 9 in Mercer County Common Pleas Court to one count of petty theft, a first-degree misdemeanor, after he was caught operating his own construction company while receiving $35,261 in temporary total disability benefits from his employer, O’Reilly Auto Parts. He was ordered to spend 180 days in jail, which would be suspended if he committed no more crimes within a year and pay full restitution to O’Reilly.

Brian Franklin of Sharonville, Ohio
Franklin avoided conviction on one charge of workers’ compensation fraud, a fifth-degree felony, after he agreed Oct. 8 in Franklin County to pay BWC $18,081 in restitution. BWC found Franklin working at a community center in 2018 while collecting BWC benefits.

Marshann Kinman of Cedar Grove, Ohio
Kinman pleaded guilty Oct. 8 to one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a fifth-degree felony, in Hamilton County Common Pleas Court. Kinman failed to let BWC know her mother had passed so she could take $6,321 in BWC widow death benefits intended for her mother. Kinman received two years of community service and was ordered to pay BWC full restitution.

Charles Ayler of Cincinnati, Ohio
Ayler pleaded guilty Oct. 3 to one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a first-degree misdemeanor, after BWC found him working while receiving BWC benefits. He was sentenced to 180 days in jail, which was suspended for two years of community service, the promise to avoid similar offenses, and to pay BWC full restitution of $6,090 and court costs of $150 by Dec. 31, 2020.

Ronald J. Dorfeld of Brunswick, Ohio
Dorfeld must pay BWC $78,957 in restitution after pleading guilty to a fifth-degree felony charge of workers’ compensation fraud Oct. 1 in a Franklin County courtroom. BWC found Dorfield operating his own business, Xtreme Multimedia Marketing, while receiving disability compensation. A Franklin County judge sentenced Dorfeld to ninth months in jail, which was suspended for five years’ probation and full restitution.

To report suspected workers’ compensation fraud, call 1-800-644-6292 or visit bwc.ohio.gov.

Happy Anniversary to Us!

On Nov. 14, 2019, our BWC Special Investigations Department celebrated the second anniversary of its Fraud Hotline system.

We launched this system during Fraud Awareness Week 2017 as an important new customer service tool for external sources to report their suspicions of workers’ compensation fraud. What a successful launch and two years it has been!

We’ve received more than 3,300 calls since then, an average of nearly seven each work day!

If you suspect workers’ compensation fraud in Ohio, call us on it.

We look forward to hearing from you. Give us a call at 1-800-644-6292. We will conduct an investigation and determine the facts. Together, we are successfully combatting workers’ compensation fraud in Ohio – one most important call at a time.

Today, during International Fraud Awareness Week 2019, we thank you for your support!

Fraud of the Day during Fraud Awareness Week

By Jeff Baker, BWC Special Investigations Department

When the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) created its Special Investigations Department (SID) in 1993, investigative professionals in the new department knew they would need to do more than detect, identify and investigate suspected workers’ compensation fraud. To fully meet the department’s mandate and mission, SID professionals would need to also deter fraud.

We felt one of the most effective ways to deter fraud might be to raise public awareness of what we do by reaching out to the media about our latest cases. In the years since, SID has collaborated with BWC’s Communications Department to issue news releases on many of the nearly 3,000 subjects convicted and sentenced as a result of our work.

To reach an even wider audience, we created our first social media accounts in 2011 and launched our Fraud Awareness Series via ohiobwcfraud and
twitter.com/ohiobwcfraud. Through our YouTube channel, we added videos showing undercover surveillance footage of subjects caught in act of committing their crimes.

The success of our Fraud Awareness Series can be measured by its reach beyond our initial audience. That is why we take note (ok, we admit we are thrilled) whenever one of our prosecution news releases is shared or re-Tweeted by a follower. Since 2014, we have seen this occur 39 times from just one follower — Larry Benson.

Larry has used our news releases as the basis for 39 of his Fraud of the Day blogs published by LexisNexis. Larry sees news releases for countless other successful fraud investigations by government agencies within hundreds of jurisdictions (local, state, and federal), so we are always delighted when he takes note of ours. We also appreciate his Fraud of the day website permits users to select their favorite examples by fraud type and state. For example, here is a filtered link to the Fraud of the Day articles for Ohio, including the 39 (and counting) articles pertaining to BWC.

Conveniently, E-mail subscribers to Fraud of the Day blogs may “get their fraud fix” by “waking up five days a week to the most current fraud article delivered straight to their inbox.”

But no matter how you access the Fraud of the Day blogs, you will note Larry’s clever use of headlines and tags referencing the subject’s type of fraud. A few of our favorites include:

Of course, as humorous as these titles may be, we know that no fraud is a matter for laughter. We certainly take all crime seriously. That is why we have dedicated our careers to detecting, identifying, investigating, prosecuting, and deterring fraud. Like Larry, we, too, are willing to deploy clever or funny headlines in news releases, but that’s only to increase the likelihood that the media and general public will take note and read and heed the releases as the cautionary tales they are.

Widening our reach, getting our word out, deters fraud. In the spirit of International Fraud Awareness Week, we invite all of you to join us in combatting crime by continuing to follow this blog and Larry’s Fraud of the Day series this week and beyond.

A letter from Jim Wernecke – Director of BWC Special Investigations

As Director of the BWC Special Investigations Department (SID), I am honored to kick off Fraud Awareness Week. I invite you to view my video message, “Fraud Hurts Us All.

In the video I discuss how workers’ compensation fraud increases premiums for employers, which reduces the money employers can invest in their employees, community and future growth. I explain how BWC employees are improving workplace health and safety, getting injured workers back to work, and keeping premium rates low for employers. I describe how SID employees protect the State Insurance Fund by detecting, investigating, and deterring fraud.

Lastly, I invite viewers to report, via an online form, suspected workers’ compensation fraud.

I also invite you to check back daily as we share success stories in our efforts to combat workers’ comp. fraud. Some stories we will highlight are:

We would not have achieved these successes without the dedicated staff members who serve our department with great skill, resourcefulness, and determination to bring justice to those who cheat our system. Their efforts create safer workplaces and ensure those who attempt to commit fraud in workers’ compensation are held accountable to the fullest extent of the law. Since our inception in 1993, we have identified over $1.9 billion in savings, as well as:

  • Completed over 69,000 investigations
  • Referred 5,420 subjects for prosecution
  • Secured 2,941 criminal convictions

We are honored and eager to join our fraud-fighting colleagues around the country and abroad each November to participate in International Fraud Awareness Week.

The campaign, which runs through Saturday, was established by the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners to highlight the issue of fraud and minimize its impacts.

Most weeks, you’ll find us sharing our fraud news on #FraudFriday. But this week, we’ll have a new fraud feature each day! So keep an eye here on our blog and on our Facebook and Twitter pages!

Happy Fraud Awareness Week!

Former deputy sheriff owes BWC $235K for workers’ comp fraud

Zanesville man earns felon status after Monday’s conviction

A Zanesville man and former county deputy sheriff must reimburse the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation nearly $235,000 in restitution following his felony conviction for workers’ compensation fraud Monday in a Franklin County courtroom.

A judge ordered Gregory A. Fitzer, 56, to pay BWC $211,536 in restitution and $23,187 in investigative costs after Fitzer pleaded guilty to a fourth-degree felony charge of workers’ compensation fraud. She also ordered the former Muskingum County deputy sheriff to serve four years of probation in lieu of a year in jail.

“Our investigators found Mr. Fitzer knowingly and with fraudulent intent deceived our agency and his physicians in order to receive disability benefits,” said BWC Administrator/CEO Stephanie McCloud.

Acting on a tip, BWC’s Special Investigations Department discovered Fitzer worked as a process server and investigator for several law firms in and around Zanesville from January 2007 to March 2016 while collecting disability benefits from BWC. The investigation, which included surveillance, multiple interviews and a review of bank and employment records, also found he worked as a truck driver and laborer for a local retailer.

In other fraud news:

BWC secured eight fraud-related convictions in August, bringing 2019’s total to 63. They include a Central Ohio nurse practitioner convicted on health care fraud charges.

BWC assisted in the investigation that led to the Aug. 30 sentencing of nurse practitioner Amy Wood-Kirk of Grove City and fiancé Ryan Edney on one count of conspiracy to commit health care fraud. Amy Wood-Kirk prescribed large quantities of medications, including prescriptions for compounded pain cremes, outside acceptable medical standards for the personal profit of herself and Edney.

The U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Ohio sentenced Wood-Kirk to five years of probation and ordered her and Edney to repay Medicaid, TriCare, and Medical Mutual of Ohio $751,809 in restitution. Wood-Kirk was also sentenced to 180 days home confinement.

In order of most recent court appearance, other August convictions include:

Jim Hesler, dba Robert’s Roofing, Batavia, Ohio
Hesler was found guilty Aug. 23 in Clermont County Common Pleas Court on two counts of workers’ compensation fraud, both fifth-degree felonies. BWC investigated Hessler after learning he had not been reporting his payroll to the agency and several injury claims had been filed.

Investigators found his business was still in operation. Sentencing is scheduled for Oct. 8, at which time a judge may determine the amount of restitution owed BWC.

Eric Johnson, Akron, Ohio
Johnson pleaded guilty Aug. 22 to one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a first-degree misdemeanor, after BWC found him working while receiving disability benefits. Prior to entering the plea, Johnson deposited full restitution of $1,062 at the clerk of court’s office.

Gregory White, dba White’s Auto Care LLC, Lorain, Ohio
White pleaded no contest Aug. 22 to one count of failure to comply, a second-degree misdemeanor, for not reinstating his BWC policy while operating his business. A second count was dismissed as White had brought his BWC account current prior to court. White was ordered to pay court costs of $167.

Everett Ferryman, Marysville, Ohio
Ferryman pleaded guilty Aug. 21 to one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a fifth-degree felony, after BWC discovered him working as a truck driver and receiving cash “under the table” while receiving BWC disability benefits. The court sentenced him to a term of probation not to exceed five years but could terminate sooner upon payment of $22,851 in restitution. The court also imposed a suspended sentence of 12 months in prison.

Tammy Hill, Jackson, Ohio
Hill pleaded guilty Aug. 12 in Jackson County Municipal Court to theft by deception, a first-degree misdemeanor, after BWC found her cashing BWC benefit checks belonging to an injured worker. A judge ordered Hill to serve up to five years of probation, complete 500 hours of community service, 180 days in jail (suspended), and pay a $100 fine and court costs within 12 months.

Paul Gall, dba Sun Masters, Brooklyn Heights, Ohio
BWC found Gall had been operating his business, Sun Masters LLC, without BWC coverage since March 2014. In lieu of conviction, Gall entered a payment plan with the Ohio Attorney General’s office after making a down payment of $12,000 toward his $44,000 balance.

Robert McWhorter, New Albany, Ohio
McWhorter pleaded guilty Aug. 7 to one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a fifth-degree felony, after BWC found him working for his landscaping company while receiving BWC disability benefits. A judge ordered McWhorter to pay $9,888 in restitution to BWC and serve one year of probation in lieu of a 6-month jail sentence.

To report suspected workers’ compensation fraud, call 1-800-644-6292 or visit bwc.ohio.gov.

Ducking workers’ comp coverage costs Mansfield freight hauler $144K

The owner of a Mansfield freight hauling and trucking company must pay $144,400 in restitution to the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) following his sentence Monday for his conviction on four felony charges related to workers’ compensation fraud.

A Richland County judge also ordered Robert Tate, owner of Elite TNT Enterprises, to serve two years of probation for his conviction Feb. 20 on two counts of workers’ comp fraud, fourth-degree felonies, and two counts of tampering with records, third-degree felonies. Tate must bring his BWC policy into compliance with state law and pay the agency $137,447 in unpaid policy premiums and $6,953 for the costs of its investigation.

“We reached out to Mr. Tate several times to follow the law and protect his employees with workers’ compensation coverage, but he chose to ignore us and it cost him,” said BWC Administrator/CEO Stephanie McCloud.

BWC’s special investigations department discovered in 2017 that Tate was operating his business without BWC coverage. After several attempts to work with Tate, agents subpoenaed bank records and audited his business, finding Tate under-reported his payroll over several payroll periods in an attempt to lower the amount he owed the agency. They also found he falsified new applications for BWC coverage by failing to list previous policies with the agency and he under-reported the number of workers he employed.

In other news:

  • A Reynoldsburg woman must pay BWC $5,010 in restitution after pleading guilty April 4 to a misdemeanor count of workers’ compensation fraud. BWC investigators discovered Amanda Treadway working as a swimming pool attendant at a condominium complex in 2017 and also as a phlebotomist while collecting BWC disability benefits.
  • A Cincinnati man found working as a truck driver while collecting BWC disability benefits was convicted of a fifth-degree felony charge of workers’ compensation fraud April 3. Antoine Harris paid BWC $7,963 in restitution prior to his guilty plea. A judge subsequently terminated Harris’s sentence of one month of probation.
  • A Cleveland Heights woman found working as a restaurant hostess while collecting BWC disability benefits pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor count of workers’ compensation fraud March 28 in Franklin County Municipal Court. A judge ordered Morgan Hines to pay BWC $4,089 in restitution, $88 in court costs and a $250 fine. The judge also sentenced her to two years of probation.

To report suspected workers’ compensation fraud, call 1-800-644-6292 or visit bwc.ohio.gov.