BWC nurse battles COVID-19 on front lines

May is National Nurses Month. BWC nurse tells her story.

By Jennifer Wolford RN, Medical Service Specialist, Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation

Away from my BWC job as a medical service specialist, I work as an intermittent nurse in an emergency department (ED) at an Akron-area hospital on weekends. Since the community spread of COVID-19 began, being an ED nurse means the odds of being exposed again and again to this virus are virtually guaranteed.

BWC nurse Jennifer Wolford, RN, works on weekends in the emergency department at an Akron-area hospital.

My colleagues and I can’t see this invisible killer, of course, but we see its impact on our patients and on each other. Not just the physical symptoms, but the fear — you can see it on their faces, you can feel it. We’ve watched patients die from this disease.

I wear a face mask and face shield for my entire 12-hour shift to protect myself and my co-workers. After my shift ends, I cover my car seat with a towel and wipe down my door handles, steering wheel, and other parts with Clorox wipes. When I come home, I immediately put my clothes into the washing machine on sanitize. I use a Clorox wipe to clean anything I touched.

After I shower, I again sanitize everything I touched. I keep a safe distance from my family. Basically, I treat myself as though I actually have COVID-19 because we know people with the disease might have it for days and weeks without showing any symptoms.

This is my life. I have a son with multiple disabilities; I can’t take any risks. Until there is a vaccine, my reality looks a lot different – this is my new normal.

Respect the virus

This is everybody’s new normal, actually. That’s why I support Governor Mike DeWine’s encouragement for all of us to wear a face mask in public where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain. You may believe you don’t have the virus, or you may feel silly wearing a mask, but none of us is safe from this disease.

Case in point: My family has a friend who is just 58 and otherwise healthy, no co-morbidities. He had the coronavirus and was on a ventilator for nearly three weeks. Thankfully, he is recovering now. Unlike my friend’s mom, my ex-husband’s stepfather, and perhaps someone you know, too.

A colleague asked me the other day, “You work at BWC now, why put yourself at risk working in an emergency department, especially these days?”

I’m a nurse, I told him. It’s what we do.

The American Nurses Association promotes May as Nurses Month to support and recognize nurses for their contributions in crises and for their ongoing roles in meeting the needs of patients and their communities.

BWC nurses help provide quality, holistic care for Ohio’s injured workers

By Mary Charney, BWC Director of Nursing

Nursing: The Balance of Mind, Body and Spirit. That’s the theme for National Nurses Week that runs this week until Friday, May 12. This year’s holistic theme also reflects BWC’s approach to caring for Ohio’s injured workers.

BWC’s 58 nurses work in a variety of areas, from medical policy and employee health to rehabilitation, claims management and clinical advisement.

They help Ohio’s injured workers and each of us remember to balance our lives — our mind, body and spirit — for total wellness.

National Nurses Week is a good time for all of us to appreciate nurses and thank them for what they do. Take time to remember the last time you talked with a nurse and how that nurse helped you. Nurses make a difference in our health care journey throughout life.

Nursing is the largest of all health care professions, according to the American Nurses Association (ANA), which declared 2017 to be the Year of the Healthy Nurse. Accordingly, the association is encouraging nurses to be healthy role models for the rest of us.

In its Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation™ Grand Challenge, the ANA states thatNurses, at 3.6 million strong and the most trusted profession, have the power to make a difference! By choosing nutritious foods and an active lifestyle, managing stress, living tobacco-free, getting preventive immunizations and screenings, and choosing protective measures such as wearing sunscreen and bicycle helmets, nurses can set an example on how to BE healthy.”

For more information on National Nurses Week, visit the American Nursing Association’s National Nurses’ Week website. Again, thank you to our nurses!