We’ll see you at the NE Ohio Safety Expo!

By Dave Costantino, BWC Loss Prevention Supervisor

It’s hard to believe our NE Ohio Safety Expo is celebrating its 12th anniversary this year. It seems like just yesterday we were planning the first one!

With 40 sessions covering a wide variety of workplace safety topics and with an exciting lineup of exhibitors, this year’s event is bigger and better than ever.

We’ll cover everything from Occupational Safety and Health Administration updates and the opioid crisis to managing workers’ comp claims and workplace wellness programs.

This year’s event is Oct. 11 at the Mahoning County Career and Technical Center. Registration is now open. Because sessions fill up fast, I encourage you to register and pre-pay by Oct. 4.

You can view the complete list of educational sessions and access the registration form here. The cost is $30 and includes a light continental breakfast and box lunch.

Like last year, the expo will offer free and confidential biometric health screenings to eligible attendees as part of our Better You, Better Ohio!® program. Workers who work for small employers (150 or fewer workers) in high-risk industries* are eligible to participate in the program. You can check if you’re eligible to participate here.

I’m proud to lead the dedicated team that puts on the expo, an event that helps make Ohio workers and workplaces safer and healthier.

I hope to see you there!

*Agriculture; automotive repair and service; construction; firefighters; health care; manufacturing; police and public safety; public employers; restaurant and food service; transportation and trucking; trash collection; wholesale and retail

BWC secures six convictions in May

Five Ohio workers and one business owner were convicted in May on workers’ compensation fraud and related charges.

The six convictions raise BWC’s total convictions for the 2019 calendar year to 38.

“When people cheat the BWC system, they are cheating the employers and hard-working Ohioans across this state who play by the rules,” said BWC Administrator/CEO Stephanie McCloud. “Congratulations to our special investigations department for stopping this fraudulent behavior.”

In order of most recent case, those convicted include:

James Nichols of Cleveland, Ohio
BWC investigators found Nichols working as a janitor and office manager while collecting BWC benefits. Nichols pleaded guilty May 13 to one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a first-degree misdemeanor. He was sentenced to 150 days in jail, suspended for two years of community control. He was ordered to pay BWC $3,525 in restitution. He made a $1,000 payment at sentencing.

Deborah Rosenlieb of Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio
Rosenlieb pleaded guilty May 9 in Summit County Common Pleas Court to workers’ compensation fraud, a fourth-degree felony, after investigators found her collecting her late father’s BWC benefits for two years. A judge ordered her to pay BWC $29,418 in restitution and serve two years of community service.

Jesse Lemaster, dba Lemaster Tree Care, Springfield, Ohio
Lemaster pleaded guilty May 8 to two counts of failure to comply, both second-degree misdemeanors, for operating his business without a valid BWC policy. He was sentenced to 30 days in jail on each charge, which was suspended pending a July 10 hearing, at which time he is to prove to the court he has valid workers’ compensation coverage.

Natasha Mitchum of Youngstown, Ohio
Mitchum pleaded guilty May 2 in Franklin County Common Pleas Court to workers’ compensation fraud, a first-degree misdemeanor, after BWC found her working as a call center employee/customer service representative while receiving disability benefits. She was sentenced to 180 days in jail, suspended for three years of community control, and ordered to pay BWC $1,863 in restitution.

To report suspected workers’ compensation fraud, call 1-800-644-6292 or visit bwc.ohio.gov.

Ohio woman keeps BWC benefits alive after father dies

Owes BWC more than $29,000 after fraud conviction

A northeastern Ohio woman pleaded guilty May 9 to workers’ compensation fraud after investigators with the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) found her collecting her father’s benefits for more than two years after he died.

Deborah Rosenlieb of Cuyahoga Falls pleaded guilty to the fourth-degree felony in the Summit County Common Pleas Court, where a judge ordered her to pay BWC $29,418 in restitution. The judge also ordered Rosenlieb to serve two years of community service.

“Ms. Rosenlieb’s father was receiving death benefits on behalf of his late wife, but when her father died in January 2016 she didn’t let us know,” said BWC Administrator/CEO Stephanie McCloud. “She knew she wasn’t entitled to these benefits, but she used them for personal expenses until we learned of her scheme in April 2018.”

In other news:

A Cleveland man must pay BWC $3,525 in restitution after pleading guilty Monday to a misdemeanor count of workers’ compensation fraud after BWC found him working as a maintenance technician and office manager while collecting disability benefits.

James Nichols, 57, also must serve two years of probation and pay court costs. He paid $1,000 toward his restitution prior to entering his guilty plea in the Franklin County Common Pleas Court.

A Youngstown woman pleaded guilty May 2 to a misdemeanor count of workers’ compensation fraud after BWC found her working for a call center while collecting disability benefits.

A Franklin County judge ordered Natasha Mitchum, 42, to pay BWC $1,863 in restitution and serve three years of probation.

To report suspected workers’ compensation fraud, call 1-800-644-6292 or visit bwc.ohio.gov.

Southwest Ohio man guilty of workers’ comp fraud

Lebanon man owes BWC more than $45,000 in restitution

A Lebanon man owes the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) more than $45,000 after pleading guilty April 22 to workers’ compensation fraud.

Michael Dwayne Myers, 49, pleaded guilty to the fifth-degree felony in the Franklin County Court of Common Pleas after BWC found him working for a Lebanon fire and water damage restoration company while collecting disability benefits in 2016 and 2017.

“The State Insurance Fund is for workers who are truly injured and need benefits to survive, not for people looking to unlawfully double dip and pad their income,” said BWC Administrator/CEO Stephanie McCloud.

A judge ordered Myers to pay BWC $45,338 in restitution, perform 25 hours of community service and serve one year of probation in lieu of six months in prison.

In other news:

A Cincinnati man was ordered to pay BWC $13,432 in restitution after pleading guilty to a first-degree misdemeanor count of workers’ compensation fraud Monday.

A Franklin County judge ordered Clinton Walker to pay $9,831 in restitution for benefits he received while working for several employers from 2012 to 2015. Walker also must pay $3,600 in investigative costs. He provided a cashier’s check to BWC at his hearing for full restitution.

A Mahoning County man pleaded guilty April 23 to a first-degree misdemeanor count of workers’ compensation fraud after BWC investigators found him working as a maintenance technician while collecting BWC benefits.

A county judge sentenced Ernest Thomas to six months of community control (probation) and ordered him to pay a $500 fine and court costs. Thomas paid restitution and investigative costs totaling $10,605 to BWC at the time of his plea.

To report suspected workers’ compensation fraud, call 1-800-644-6292 or visit bwc.ohio.gov.