BWC secures 14 fraud-related convictions in October

Fraudsters owe BWC more than $283,000 in restitution

The Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) secured 14 fraud-related convictions in October, with those convicted owing BWC a combined $283,146 in restitution.

Those convicted include injured workers found working while collecting disability benefits, family members collecting their deceased parent’s compensation benefits, and business owners whose coverage had lapsed.

“When people cheat BWC or fail to cover their own employees, they are cheating the injured workers who really need our help and the employers in our system that follow the law,” said BWC Administrator/CEO Stephanie McCloud.

In order of most recent court appearance, those convicted in October include:

Bruce Starkey of Cincinnati, Ohio
Starkey pleaded guilty Oct. 17 and was sentenced in Hamilton County Common Pleas Court Nov. 4 on one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a fifth-degree felony. Starkey received 100 hours of community service and was required to pay BWC full restitution for the $1,459 in permanent total disability benefits he took from his mother’s bank account after she passed. He failed to inform BWC of her passing and wrote 15 checks, forging his mother’s signature.

Cecil Piner of Xenia, Ohio
Piner pleaded guilty Oct. 31 in Franklin County Common Pleas Court on one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a fifth-degree felony, after BWC found him driving a school bus while receiving $17,901 in disability benefits. He was sentenced to five years’ probation in lieu of 12 months in jail and ordered to pay court costs and full restitution.

Kyle Foreman of New Carlisle, Ohio
Foreman pleaded guilty Oct. 30 in Clark County Municipal Court on two counts of failure to comply, both second-degree misdemeanors. His coverage for Kyle S. Foreman Enterprises had lapsed since November 2017, and he failed to pay the premiums before taking his company into bankruptcy. He was ordered to pay a $100 fine and court costs for each count.

Michelle Smith of Cincinnati, Ohio
Smith, 57, pleaded guilty Oct. 23 to one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a fifth-degree felony, after BWC discovered she owned and ran two businesses, Expression Unique LLC and Later in Life Brides, while collecting BWC benefits for workers deemed permanently and totally disabled. A Franklin County judge ordered Smith to pay BWC $40,873 dollars in restitution and serve five years of non-reporting community control (probation). If she violates her probation, she must serve a year in prison.

Louis Tombazzi of Cleveland, Ohio
BWC found Tombazzi owed the agency approximately $75,000 in premiums after letting the policy lapse for his business, Garda Architectural Fabrication. He pleaded guilty Oct. 16 in Cleveland Municipal Court to one count of failure to comply, a second-degree misdemeanor, and was ordered to serve 90 days in jail (suspended), pay a $400 fine, and serve two years’ probation. He also was ordered to report monthly to the court his effort to reduce or pay off his BWC obligation.

Natalia Daniels of Concord Township, Ohio
Daniels pleaded guilty Oct. 16 to one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a first-degree misdemeanor, after receiving $3,600 in BWC disability benefits while working as a bus driver for a senior living facility and as a laborer for an insurance company. A judge ordered her to pay full restitution to BWC and serve 18 months of probation in lieu of a 180-day jail sentence.

Vicki Aloisio of West Chester, Ohio
Aloisio was convicted Oct. 11 on two counts of failure to comply, both second-degree midemeanors, for failing to carry BWC coverage on her business, Richard Aloisio Trucking Inc., despite numerous BWC attempts to assist her. Aloisio owes $28,000 in past-due premiums and penalties. Sentencing in a Butler County courtroom is scheduled for Dec. 6.

Ahmad Al-thamra of Akron, Ohio
Al-thamra pleaded guilty Oct. 10 in Akron Municipal Court to two counts of failure to comply, both second-degree misdemeanors, for failing to maintain workers’ compensation coverage on his business, The Family Corner Store. He was ordered to pay $300 in fines and ordered to pay court costs and obey all laws for one year.

Jason Gaschler of Cheswick, Pennsylvania
Gaschler pleaded guilty Oct. 10 of one count of theft, a first-degree misdemeanor, for operating a construction company, General License Contracting, in Pennsylvania while receiving $6,864 in BWC benefits. He was sentenced to one day in jail (time served) and made full restitution at the time of his hearing.

Jason Rissner of Rockford, Ohio
Rissner pleaded guilty Oct. 9 in Mercer County Common Pleas Court to one count of petty theft, a first-degree misdemeanor, after he was caught operating his own construction company while receiving $35,261 in temporary total disability benefits from his employer, O’Reilly Auto Parts. He was ordered to spend 180 days in jail, which would be suspended if he committed no more crimes within a year and pay full restitution to O’Reilly.

Brian Franklin of Sharonville, Ohio
Franklin avoided conviction on one charge of workers’ compensation fraud, a fifth-degree felony, after he agreed Oct. 8 in Franklin County to pay BWC $18,081 in restitution. BWC found Franklin working at a community center in 2018 while collecting BWC benefits.

Marshann Kinman of Cedar Grove, Ohio
Kinman pleaded guilty Oct. 8 to one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a fifth-degree felony, in Hamilton County Common Pleas Court. Kinman failed to let BWC know her mother had passed so she could take $6,321 in BWC widow death benefits intended for her mother. Kinman received two years of community service and was ordered to pay BWC full restitution.

Charles Ayler of Cincinnati, Ohio
Ayler pleaded guilty Oct. 3 to one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a first-degree misdemeanor, after BWC found him working while receiving BWC benefits. He was sentenced to 180 days in jail, which was suspended for two years of community service, the promise to avoid similar offenses, and to pay BWC full restitution of $6,090 and court costs of $150 by Dec. 31, 2020.

Ronald J. Dorfeld of Brunswick, Ohio
Dorfeld must pay BWC $78,957 in restitution after pleading guilty to a fifth-degree felony charge of workers’ compensation fraud Oct. 1 in a Franklin County courtroom. BWC found Dorfield operating his own business, Xtreme Multimedia Marketing, while receiving disability compensation. A Franklin County judge sentenced Dorfeld to ninth months in jail, which was suspended for five years’ probation and full restitution.

To report suspected workers’ compensation fraud, call 1-800-644-6292 or visit bwc.ohio.gov.

Happy Anniversary to Us!

On Nov. 14, 2019, our BWC Special Investigations Department celebrated the second anniversary of its Fraud Hotline system.

We launched this system during Fraud Awareness Week 2017 as an important new customer service tool for external sources to report their suspicions of workers’ compensation fraud. What a successful launch and two years it has been!

We’ve received more than 3,300 calls since then, an average of nearly seven each work day!

If you suspect workers’ compensation fraud in Ohio, call us on it.

We look forward to hearing from you. Give us a call at 1-800-644-6292. We will conduct an investigation and determine the facts. Together, we are successfully combatting workers’ compensation fraud in Ohio – one most important call at a time.

Today, during International Fraud Awareness Week 2019, we thank you for your support!

Fraud of the Day during Fraud Awareness Week

By Jeff Baker, BWC Special Investigations Department

When the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) created its Special Investigations Department (SID) in 1993, investigative professionals in the new department knew they would need to do more than detect, identify and investigate suspected workers’ compensation fraud. To fully meet the department’s mandate and mission, SID professionals would need to also deter fraud.

We felt one of the most effective ways to deter fraud might be to raise public awareness of what we do by reaching out to the media about our latest cases. In the years since, SID has collaborated with BWC’s Communications Department to issue news releases on many of the nearly 3,000 subjects convicted and sentenced as a result of our work.

To reach an even wider audience, we created our first social media accounts in 2011 and launched our Fraud Awareness Series via ohiobwcfraud and
twitter.com/ohiobwcfraud. Through our YouTube channel, we added videos showing undercover surveillance footage of subjects caught in act of committing their crimes.

The success of our Fraud Awareness Series can be measured by its reach beyond our initial audience. That is why we take note (ok, we admit we are thrilled) whenever one of our prosecution news releases is shared or re-Tweeted by a follower. Since 2014, we have seen this occur 39 times from just one follower — Larry Benson.

Larry has used our news releases as the basis for 39 of his Fraud of the Day blogs published by LexisNexis. Larry sees news releases for countless other successful fraud investigations by government agencies within hundreds of jurisdictions (local, state, and federal), so we are always delighted when he takes note of ours. We also appreciate his Fraud of the day website permits users to select their favorite examples by fraud type and state. For example, here is a filtered link to the Fraud of the Day articles for Ohio, including the 39 (and counting) articles pertaining to BWC.

Conveniently, E-mail subscribers to Fraud of the Day blogs may “get their fraud fix” by “waking up five days a week to the most current fraud article delivered straight to their inbox.”

But no matter how you access the Fraud of the Day blogs, you will note Larry’s clever use of headlines and tags referencing the subject’s type of fraud. A few of our favorites include:

Of course, as humorous as these titles may be, we know that no fraud is a matter for laughter. We certainly take all crime seriously. That is why we have dedicated our careers to detecting, identifying, investigating, prosecuting, and deterring fraud. Like Larry, we, too, are willing to deploy clever or funny headlines in news releases, but that’s only to increase the likelihood that the media and general public will take note and read and heed the releases as the cautionary tales they are.

Widening our reach, getting our word out, deters fraud. In the spirit of International Fraud Awareness Week, we invite all of you to join us in combatting crime by continuing to follow this blog and Larry’s Fraud of the Day series this week and beyond.

A letter from Jim Wernecke – Director of BWC Special Investigations

As Director of the BWC Special Investigations Department (SID), I am honored to kick off Fraud Awareness Week. I invite you to view my video message, “Fraud Hurts Us All.

In the video I discuss how workers’ compensation fraud increases premiums for employers, which reduces the money employers can invest in their employees, community and future growth. I explain how BWC employees are improving workplace health and safety, getting injured workers back to work, and keeping premium rates low for employers. I describe how SID employees protect the State Insurance Fund by detecting, investigating, and deterring fraud.

Lastly, I invite viewers to report, via an online form, suspected workers’ compensation fraud.

I also invite you to check back daily as we share success stories in our efforts to combat workers’ comp. fraud. Some stories we will highlight are:

We would not have achieved these successes without the dedicated staff members who serve our department with great skill, resourcefulness, and determination to bring justice to those who cheat our system. Their efforts create safer workplaces and ensure those who attempt to commit fraud in workers’ compensation are held accountable to the fullest extent of the law. Since our inception in 1993, we have identified over $1.9 billion in savings, as well as:

  • Completed over 69,000 investigations
  • Referred 5,420 subjects for prosecution
  • Secured 2,941 criminal convictions

We are honored and eager to join our fraud-fighting colleagues around the country and abroad each November to participate in International Fraud Awareness Week.

The campaign, which runs through Saturday, was established by the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners to highlight the issue of fraud and minimize its impacts.

Most weeks, you’ll find us sharing our fraud news on #FraudFriday. But this week, we’ll have a new fraud feature each day! So keep an eye here on our blog and on our Facebook and Twitter pages!

Happy Fraud Awareness Week!

What do you know about workers’ comp fraud? Our sleuths have questions – and answers!

By Melissa Vince, BWC Public Relations Manager

We’ve had a great time talking workers’ comp fraud this International Fraud Awareness Week. We enjoyed sharing what we do to detect, deter and put a stop to workers’ compensation fraud in Ohio.

Our fraud investigators especially look forward to participating every year because they want to raise awareness and encourage tips from the public, but also because they truly enjoy what they do.

And we appreciate them because they do a great job. So, in honor of them, we let them take a little break to have some fun putting together this quiz challenging your knowledge of workers’ compensation fraud.

So, fire up that brain and let’s get started. Just flip your monitor over for the answers listed at the bottom.

Thanks for following us this week! We’ll be back next year for Fraud Awareness Week, but don’t go away because we’re here all year long on our blog, Twitter and Facebook.

  1. True or false?
    Fraud and abuse are the same.
  2. True or false?
    Proving fraud requires evidence of “knowledge and intent”
  3. True or false?
    Abuse can be criminally prosecuted under the law.
  4. BWC has teams focused on investigating the following types of fraud:
    a) Claimant
    b) Employer
    c) Medical provider
    d) All of the above
  5. Which is an example of fraud?
    a) Billing for services not rendered (a doctor bills for procedures not performed)
    b) Classifying full-time employees as independent contractors/subcontractors.
    c) A claimant performing physical activity outside of his or her restrictions
    d) All of the above
  6. What are the two most common fraud allegations our investigators receive related to medical providers?
    a) Billing for services not rendered (a doctor bills for procedures not performed)
    b) Unlicensed provider (not licensed to practice medicine in the State of Ohio)
    c) Unbundling (charging separately for bundled services)
    d) Upcoding (billing for a more expensive service than the one provided to the claimant)
  7. What is the most common fraud allegation our investigators receive related to employers?
    a) No coverage
    b) Lapsed coverage
    c) Falsified certificate of premium coverage
    d) Underreporting payroll
  8. What is the most common fraud allegation our investigators receive related to claimants?
    a) Physical activity (performing physical activity outside of his or her restrictions; malingering)
    b) Work/Comp (working while receiving lost time benefits)
    c) False claim (staged accidents; false injuries)
    d) Altered documents

 

It’s not easy being Green: Cleveland florist convicted of work comp fraud

Green Thumb Florists owes BWC $32,000

The owner of a Cleveland flower shop owes the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) nearly $32,000 in restitution after pleading guilty to workers’ compensation fraud in late September.

Mary Green, the owner of Green Thumb Florists, was ordered to pay BWC $31,562, sentenced to five years of community control and fined $315 after pleading guilty Sept. 27 to one fourth-degree felony count of workers compensation fraud in the Cuyahoga County Court of Common Pleas.

Acting on a tip, agents with BWC’s special investigations department (SID) discovered Green had altered a BWC certificate to make it appear her business had proper workers compensation coverage, as required by state law. Agents also discovered her actual policy had been in lapsed status since 2011.

“Our agents made multiple site visits, witnessed multiple employees and put Mary Green on notice to bring her BWC policy into compliance with the law,” said SID Director Jim Wernecke. “But when she wouldn’t cooperate, we brought her case to the county prosecutor and now she has a felony on her record. It didn’t have to go this far. We really need employers to reach out to BWC if they’re struggling to pay their premiums.”

To report suspected workers’ compensation fraud, call 1-800-644-6292 or visit bwc.ohio.gov.

Spotlight: Our college interns

By Jeff Baker, Program Administrator, BWC Special Investigations Department

In recognition of International Fraud Awareness Week 2017, we are highlighting careers in criminal investigations, especially those that commence with the study of criminology, criminal justice, law enforcement, digital forensics or data analytics.

History:  BWC’s Special Investigations Department (SID) created its college relations program in 1995 to promote the study and practice of criminology, criminal justice, law enforcement and public administration. On college and university campuses throughout Ohio (and beyond), SID staff members exchange insights with students, faculty and staff members on how to combat crime.

Since the program began 20 years ago, SID has recruited, selected and trained more than 300 paid interns and unpaid externs. Many have gone on to become law enforcement officers, criminal investigators, special agents, digital forensic analysts, assistant special agents in charge and special agents in charge. We currently employ in full time positions, thirteen graduates from our SID college internship program.

On Campus: BWC representatives travel to colleges and universities to meet with candidates. For example, on Nov. 14, BWC was represented at Bowling Green State University by SID Special Agent in Charge Craig Matthews and BWC Human Capital Management Analyst Megan Lentz.

They participated in a job fair specifically targeted toward criminal justice majors. Matthews described the internship program in the special investigations department at the Toledo service office and Lentz explained the application process.

Panel Discussion:  For two hours on Nov. 15, two investigative professionals, Taylor Scarberry and Paul Balzer, participated in our agency’s second panel event where five current permanent employees who started out at BWC as interns discussed their experiences with our current interns. Moderated by Megan Lentz, these successful professionals painted a picture of what it is like to permanently come on board with our agency.

The former SID interns described their success and career paths working in specialized units, including the intelligence and special investigations units (SIUs), as well the health care provider team and regional claimant SIU.

Megan Lentz, Kayla Michel, Luke Bogner, Nathan LaChappelle, Taylor Scarberry and Paul Balzer

They described their many important responsibilities as a college intern with SID. They also mentioned what they did not do, such as getting coffee or food for their co-workers, running any errand, or any other trivial activity.

Panelist Taylor Scarberry: Taylor started his career with BWC in November 2012 as an exemplary college intern with the Columbus SIU. On August 22, 2016, he commenced his permanent employment with BWC as a Criminal Investigator with the Southeast Regional Claimant SIU, assigned to the Cambridge service office. He reports to special agent in charge Scott Lape, a former SID college intern.

During today’s panel discussion, Taylor offered the following knowledge, understanding and wisdom:

“Following my experience as a college intern with the Special Investigations Department and obtaining my Bachelor’s degree in Criminology from The Ohio State University, it was important to me to find a career in criminal justice.  I discovered quickly during my internship that criminal justice was something I was passionate about and saw myself establishing a career in.  BWC provided me that opportunity and the team atmosphere within the SID is something I enjoy being a part of every day.”

Panelist Paul Balzer: Paul started his career with BWC in 2010 while a student at The Ohio State University. Following his internship, he joined BWC full-time as a criminal investigator with health care provider team (HCPT) in December 2011. On October 7, 2012, Paul was promoted to special agent with the HCPT. On Nov. 28, 2016, he was promoted to fraud analyst with the intelligence unit, a team supervised by a former SID college intern, special agent in charge Eric Brown.

As an experienced panelist who has already earned multiple promotions, Paul offered the following recollections and insights:

“I had no idea what this agency did or that it even existed. But the synopsis I read about the internship combined all three things I had wanted to do – work in health care, computer science and criminology. In my current position, I want to continue to make an impact. There are a lot of challenges in the criminal justice system, but we can still make an impact and improve the lives of others. I hope we continue to use critical resources in the most efficient manner possible to stop fraud, because fraud just drives up costs for the entire system.”

Reasons for Ongoing Success: The SID college relations program has been successful in hiring interns with a variety of backgrounds, majors and career goals who quickly become vital assets to BWC’s efforts to fight workers’ compensation fraud. We solicit and heed feedback from our interns to continually improve our program.

The Future: If you know of any students that would be a great fit in our program, please encourage them to submit an application via our Future Opportunities posting. We have an intern position that we are looking to fill right now and we are using the Future Opportunities posting to select our applications. Additionally, we have the specific intern positions posted:

Suspect fraud? Call our Fraud Hotline!

By Jeff Baker, Program Administrator, BWC Special Investigations Department

In recognition of International Fraud Awareness Week 2017, we are increasing awareness of fraud and the vigilance of everyday citizens to report suspected fraud committed against the Ohio workers’ compensation system.

A suspicion can be reported online, by email to our secure BWC Allegations@bwc.state.oh.us account, U.S. Postal Service or by calling our Fraud Hotline at 1-800-644-6292. Calling the BWC Fraud Hotline is the most interactive and direct way that you, our partners in fraud prevention and detection, can help.

We realize that such partnerships are necessary to achieve our fraud prevention goals. Since the creation of our Special Investigations Department (SID) in 1993, thousands of our closed, founded cases started with a call to our Fraud Hotline. For example, the conviction of Tim Tokles on August 30, 2017 was the result of just such a call.

You may suspect someone is working while receiving compensation, filed a false claim for an injury that did not happen or is committing another type of workers’ compensation fraud. Calling a fraud hotline may seem rather intimidating. We understand that it can be a nerve-wracking decision to make the call. The person you suspect of fraud could be a friend, a loved-one or even an immediate family member.

Above all, we realize the importance of personal security and safety to each caller.

When you call the SID Fraud Hotline, you will speak with a real person on the other end, one who is ready and willing to listen to your concerns and has years of investigative knowledge, skills and experience securing the essential information from sources like you. Whether your fraud hotline agent is Jake, Taylor, Karen, Connor, Jeff, or any of eight of our most experienced fraud analysts assigned to special investigations unit (SIUs) statewide, you will know within seconds that you have reached a committed, successful professional.

Your fraud hotline agent will know and promptly secure the information needed by our teams of 125 SID employees. Your identity will remain either anonymous or confidential, depending upon your preference. You do not need to have proven any facts; you do not even need to have 100 percent confidence in your suspicion. You need only to suspect that fraud may have occurred or continue to occur. We will conduct the investigation and determine the facts.    

The entire process entails as few as five minutes. Nonetheless, collecting the right information from a caller requires our SID Fraud Hotline professionals to devote as much time as the caller’s unique allegation merits.

When calling, please provide the information you have, including:

  • The name and address (if known) of the subject you’re reporting;
  • A description of the suspect’s behavior; and
  • Any other information that might pertain to the suspected fraudulent activity.

It is through the vigilance of citizens like you, that we are combatting workers’ compensation fraud in Ohio.

In pursuit of fairness – #FraudWeek 2017

By Jim Wernecke, Director, BWC Special Investigations Department

I have always appreciated the importance of fairness and integrity. I have used these virtues as a guide throughout my career, from early on when I supervised 15 employees at a small manufacturing company, to my 25 years with the Ohio State Highway Patrol and now as head of the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation’s Special Investigations Department.

I am privileged to lead 122 professionals who work to deter, detect and investigate workers’ compensation fraud in the state of Ohio. We pursue cases of claimant, medical provider and employer fraud.

What drives a claimant to file a false claim; an employer to purposely misclassify their workers; or a physician to fudge paperwork to secure higher service payments? We can debate the reasons, and they probably vary in each case, but my drive to halt wrongdoing comes from an appreciation for standards, rules and enforcement of the law that are conducted uniformly, fairly and systematically. In short, I want to know that others are following the same rules you and I follow.

It is easy to translate this philosophy into the world of workers’ compensation when you think about employer premiums, medical services and protection of our injured workers. Injured workers deserve a fair system that’s focused on their care and recovery. Employers want their competitors to play by the same rules, and they want assurance that any employee who attempts to gain undeserved benefits will be held accountable. And we all want truthful and professional physicians delivering our medical care.

These are among the many reasons I count fairness and integrity among the most important qualities you’ll find in a person. Treat people fairly, and treat them the way you want to be treated. Our integrity is on the line when we don’t accept the responsibility and tell the truth. Once trust is lost, it’s likely gone forever. I’m sure many of you feel the same.

We take great care to protect the dollars Ohio employers set aside to care for their injured workers. We’re not too shy to say we think we do a pretty good job, but we’re always seeking improvement. That’s why we enjoy taking part in International Fraud Awareness Week each year. We’re not only able to highlight our successes, but also engage and learn from our fraud-fighting peers across the country. This year will be no different.

Those of you who follow workers’ comp fraud in Ohio know we share our fraud news weekly on “Fraud Friday,” but we always take it to another level during IFAW. Please join us this week and all year long as we share new cases, tips for identifying and preventing fraud, insights from our investigators, and much more on our Facebook and Twitter pages.

Happy Fraud Awareness Week!

Another type of BWC certificate: Showing our appreciation to yet another employer source

By Jeff Baker, Program Administrator, BWC Special Investigations Department

Normally, when our readers think of the words “BWC” and “certificate,” they think of the BWC Certificate of Coverage. This makes sense. The certificate is widely seen and easily recognized. It is the official document employers often frame to display within their business.

Understandably, the law-abiding business owner wants every employee and customer to see that they have secured workers’ compensation coverage from our agency. They know that others see it as proof of the business’s legitimacy and a sign of the owner’s prudence.

That might explain why Vice President of Operations Philip Koster and Human Resources Generalist Lisa Lucas with the Columbus-based business MedCare Ambulance were surprised when we contacted their organization asking to present them with another type of BWC certificate: a Certificate of Appreciation.

Scott Lape, Lisa Lucas, Philip Koster and John Koehl

Scott Lape, Special Agent in Charge of the Southeast Regional Claimant Special Investigations Unit (SIU) within the Special Investigations Department (SID), explained that the certificate acknowledges the business’s referral of a fraud allegation to BWC. The referral, submitted via an online fraud allegation form, had resulted in the successful prosecution of a subject on Sept. 6.

medcare-certificateSigned by SID Director Jim Wernecke, the framed certificate is a simple way to demonstrate our thanks to MedCare Ambulance and others who are our partners in combating fraud.

Significantly, Philip Koster and Lisa Lucas received the Certificate of Appreciation from Scott Lape and Columbus SIU Fraud Analyst John Koehl during International Fraud Awareness Week (IFAW) 2016. Sponsored annually by the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, IFAW is dedicated to the prevention, identification and investigation of fraud – wherever it might occur throughout the world.

Just like the talented and dedicated professionals with MedCare Ambulance, you are our eyes and ears in Ohio! Thank you for your help in stamping out fraud, and please, keep those tips coming. To report workers’ comp fraud to BWC, click here or call our fraud hotline at 1-800-644-6292.