Big news! Your Safety Innovation could be worth $10,000

BWC increases prize amount for annual awards

By Erik Harden, BWC Public Information Officer

Have you thought about applying for our Safety Innovation Awards in years past but put it off or forgot to do it? We have at least 4,000 more reasons for you to not delay any further!

To encourage applications and reward innovation more than ever, we have raised the prize amounts for our 2020 Safety Innovation Awards. The top prize is now $10,000, up from $6,000! Second place receives $6,000, third place $4,000, and honorable mention receives $1,500.

Our Safety Innovation Awards celebrate creative solutions that improve the safety and health in Ohio workplaces. Examples of innovations include:

  • Technological advancements.
  • Creative use of existing equipment.
  • Unique processes and practices.
  • Development of new equipment.

If your organization has developed any of the above to reduce the workplace risks faced by Ohio workers, we want to hear from you. Don’t wait, you have only until Sept. 30 to apply.

Winners in past years include a Mercer County company that captured first place with a device it developed for loading hogs into a trailer with minimal stress to the hogs and potential for injury to workers. Last year, the Springfield company Navistar captured first place with a robotic system that minimized worker exposure to a particularly strenuous procedure involved in the tearing down and welding of truck cabs.

This year’s finalists will receive the previously-mentioned cash awards and statewide recognition at our Ohio Safety Congress & Expo in Columbus March 11-13, 2020. You can check out descriptions of all the 2019 finalists’ innovations here.

We hope the past finalists and their ideas will inspire you to apply for the 2020 awards. If you have any questions about the program, email bwcsafetyinnovations@bwc.state.oh.us or call 1-800-644-6292.

We look forward to seeing your innovations!

Ohio BWC honored to host national conference

Thank you to everyone who helped make it a success

By Kendra DePaul, BWC Other States Coverage Manager

Almost 500 workers’ comp professionals traveled to Cleveland the week of July 21 for the 2019 American Association of State Compensation Insurance Funds (AASCIF) Annual Conference. We are happy to report the conference was a resounding success!

A different state fund hosts the conference each year, and we had the honor of hosting this year. Our staff helped with planning and were on site at the conference to make sure everything went smoothly.

BWC Administrator/CEO Stephanie McCloud kicked off the event by welcoming guests to Ohio!

The best part of the conference was workers’ comp professionals coming together to share best practices and discuss our common issues. AASCIF has members from 26 states, plus eight workers’ comp boards in Canada.

This year, members of the Puerto Rico workers’ comp fund attended the conference. The combined experience and expertise in one place was unparalleled.

We had great keynote speakers, including several with Ohio ties. Brad Hurtig, who spoke about his journey after losing both of his hands in a devasting workplace accident. In addition, Sam Quinones – author of “Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic” – spoke about the deadly drug scourge plaguing our country.

There were also sessions on topics such as medical marijuana, customer service, the state of the economy, and national workers’ compensation issues.

When the annual communication award winners were announced, we were pleased to find ourselves in the winner’s circle among many of our peers including Pinnacol Assurance, Texas Mutual Insurance Company, Oregon’s State Accident Insurance Fund, California’s State Compensation Insurance Fund, Missouri Employers Mutual, Louisiana Workers’ Compensation Corporation, Minnesota’s State Fund Mutual Insurance Co., North Dakota Workforce Safety & Insurance, The Beacon Mutual Insurance Co. and Montana State Fund.

We accepted awards in the following categories:

  • Open Category: First Place for the 2019 Medical & Health Symposium.
  • Events: Second Place for the 2019 Ohio Safety Congress & Expo.
  • Excellence in Writing: Third Place for “Safety Pays for Columbus Brewery.”

In closing, we’d like to offer a huge THANK YOU to the AASCIF core team, sponsors, attendees, presenters and BWC ambassadors for making the 2019 AASCIF Annual Conference a success!

Next year, the Colorado state fund, Pinnacol Assurance, will host the conference in Denver. We’ll see you there!

‘Walking down grain’ is a deadly operation (Don’t do it)

Two workplace deaths in July heighten awareness for grain bin safety

By Bruce Loughner CSP, BWC Technical Safety Advisor

This is my second blog post on deadly grain bin accidents this year, and I hope it’s the last.

But as a safety professional for the state of Ohio, I feel obligated to spread the word on grain bin safety precautions following the tragic loss of two lives at a Toledo grain facility July 19.

I don’t know all the details surrounding the accident that claimed the lives of a 29-year-old Rossford man and a 56-year-old Perrysburg man that hot Friday afternoon, but according to news reports the two men died when they climbed inside a grain silo to break up compacted grain and unplug a blocked hole. This is a hazardous process known as “walking down grain.” The two were engulfed in grain and suffocated.

OSHA prohibits “walking down grain” and similar practices in flat storage structures. Regulations also limit employee access, entry and work in any grain storage bin. When permitted, the standards require strict hazard control measures and training for all employees assigned tasks that require bin entry. OSHA has a variety of resources that explain the deadly hazards associated with grain handling operations.

In a March 2019 BWC Blog post, I spoke about a grain bin accident that occurred years ago when three young boys entered a grain bin to break up stored corn so that it could flow. The two employees in Toledo were performing a similar task.

News reports indicate emergency responders had early contact with one of the trapped workers. Unfortunately, the rescue turned into a recovery operation as time passed and the grain suffocated the two employees. The hazards are well known, and environmental conditions are ripe for grain to bridge and develop air pockets.

Two other recent grain-bin deaths in Ohio involved a 20-year-old worker being caught in an auger and a 68-year-old farmer being engulfed in a bin. Each death was preventable. New innovations in equipment with proper training and knowledge can be used to complete the task without ever entering the grain bins.  All grain handling deaths and serious injuries can be prevented.

As the first line of defense, BWC encourages eliminating hazards through engineering control measures, including mechanical raking devices, proper ventilation for dust and mold control, and the use of vibrating mechanisms to break up bridged grain.

Prior to entering a grain bin, take the following precautions:

  • Conduct a job safety analysis to identify specific hazards and to determine the best course of action for eliminating or controlling the hazards using engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment.
  • Treat the grain bin as a confined space and develop specific procedures for determining if it is safe to enter, how to enter, how to work safely in the space, and how to get out safely in the event of an emergency. Develop a communication and rescue plan.
  • Develop a program and procedures for lock out and tag out of all energy sources. Never allow employees to enter the grain bin while the auger is activated or when it could become activated.
  • Provide the appropriate personal protective equipment (e.g. respirator, safety harness, and lifeline) depending on the hazards that might be encountered. Train employees how to use it properly.
  • Contact the local fire department for assistance in developing rescue procedures. Practice self-rescue and other rescue procedures.
  • Train and educate employees engaged in grain bin operations by emphasizing hazards and safety procedures.

Whether you operate a small farm or a large handling and storage operation for exporting grain, a BWC consultant can assist you.

We provide on-site consultations to assess hazards, identify engineering and other control measures, and make you aware of federal and state requirements.

In addition, we can help with the development of site-specific safety procedures, training and educational resources to address the deadly hazards associated with grain bin operations.

Check out this BWC brochure for additional information. For more on the July 19 tragedy, read this story from the Toledo Blade.

Mosquitos and spiders and snakes, oh my!

By Gabrielle Tharp, BWC Occupational Safety & Hygiene Fellow

With summer in full swing, we’re more exposed to outdoor hazards, such as insects and snakes. As an outdoor worker, it is important you know the kinds of pests you may encounter during the workday. Below are tips for identifying these critters and keeping yourself safe.

Mosquitoes and Ticks

Mosquitoes are a concern because of infectious diseases they may carry. In Ohio, four mosquito-borne diseases are common, including:

  • Eastern equine encephalitis virus.
  • La Crosse virus.
  • Louis encephalitis virus.
  • West Nile virus.

You can reduce mosquito populations at your worksite by eliminating all sources of standing water (e.g., tires, buckets, etc.). Clear debris and fill in ruts that could be collecting water.

Tick-borne diseases are a growing concern in Ohio. Species of ticks to watch out for include the Black Legged “Deer” Tick, the American Dog Tick, and the Lone Star Tick. To prevent tick bites, apply a tick repellent that is at least 25% DEET (diethyltoluamide) or use Permethrin to treat your clothing. Check out our previous blog post for more info about ticks.

To fight mosquito and tick bites, wear clothing that covers exposed skin to protect your hands, arms, legs, and neck. To prevent mosquito bites, use insect repellents with an EPA-registered active ingredient such as DEET. If also applying sunscreen, make sure to apply it before the insect repellent.

Bees and Wasps

To prevent bee and wasp stings, wear light-colored clothing, avoid perfumes, and avoid bananas and banana-scented toiletries. Wear clean clothes and bathe daily because sweat may incite some bees. Remain calm and do not swat at the bee or wasp.

If you are stung, wash the site with soap and water. Remove the stinger using gauze to wipe over the area or by scraping a fingernail over the area. Never squeeze the stinger or use tweezers. Apply ice to reduce swelling and do not scratch the site of the sting. Those with extreme allergies to bee stings should carry an epinephrine pen with them to combat the reaction.

Spiders

There are two species of spiders in Ohio that are dangers to humans: The Black Widow and the Brown Recluse Spider.

The Black Widow is normally shiny black with a red hourglass marking on the underside of the abdomen. Its venom produces pain at the bite area which may spread to the chest, abdomen, or the entire body. The Recluse Spider is brown with a recognizable dark violin-shaped marking on its head. The venom from the Recluse Spider can cause a severe skin lesion by destroying skin tissue.

Snakes

In Ohio there are three venomous snakes: The Timber Rattlesnake, Massasauga Rattlesnake, and the Eastern Copperhead snake. There are many more non-venomous than venomous snakes in Ohio.

Non-venomous snakes normally have an oval head, round pupils, and only nostrils present. Venomous snakes have distinctly triangular heads, elliptical pupils, and extra heat-sensing pits between their eyes and nostrils. Their tails end in a rattle except for the Eastern Copperhead.

Venomous snake bites result in immediate swelling, discoloration, and pain. Extreme symptoms that later develop can include slurred speech, convulsions, paralysis, and loss of consciousness. Transport snakebite victims to a hospital immediately. To prevent snakebites, you should:

  • Never try to handle any snake.
  • Avoid tall grass areas and piles of leaves.
  • Avoid climbing on rock or wood piles.
  • Wear boots and long pants, and leather gloves when handling brush and debris.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources has a Reptiles of Ohio Field Guide to help you identify the wide variety of snakes in our state.

Benefits of snakes and spiders

Although our first instinct is to step on or smash a spider, you may want to think twice. Spiders regularly capture and help control nuisance pests and even disease-carrying insects, like mosquitoes. Snakes can keep pests (e.g., rats and mice) in check. Non-venomous snakes often prey on poisonous snakes, which can lower our chances of encountering a more dangerous snake.

Visit us at the Ohio State Fair!

Stop by our booth to learn about our safety and wellness programs  

Hello from the 2019 Ohio State Fair! We’re in the Bricker Marketplace – booth 02 to be exact – and we’re excited to share how we’ve got you covered!

At work – Our safety services make workplaces and jobs safer; we’re also here if you get hurt on the job.

Your health and wellness – We’re keeping Ohioans healthy with wellness initiatives like Better You, Better Ohio!®

On and off the clock – A lot of safe practices overlap between work and home. Recognizing hazards is the first step to avoiding them.

Stop by our booth to learn more! Stick around to play safety plinko, get a photo, or check your eligibility for our Better You, Better Ohio! wellness program.

We’re honored to be part of this traditional event for Ohioans and one of the largest state fairs in the nation.

We hope to see you there!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feeling the heat? Stay safe with preventive measures

By Isayah Hickson, BWC Occupational Safety & Hygiene Fellow

Click on graphic for full size image. Courtesy of the National Weather Service.

A glance at the thermometer tells the story: we’re officially in the dog days of summer.

This means we’re in the hottest part of the season and at greater risk of heat-related illness such as heat exhaustion and heat stroke. So, what’s the difference between the two?

Heat exhaustion is a result of the body
overheating. Common symptoms may include heavy sweating, dizziness, fainting, and rapid pulse.

Heat stroke is a medical emergency. It occurs when the body’s core temperature rises too high and its natural cooling system stops working. Symptoms may include an altered mental state, lack of perspiration, rash, muscle cramps, exhaustion, and stroke.

Who is at risk?
The risk of heat illness is greatest for workers in hot/humid environments and outdoor workers. People who are obese, have high blood pressure, heart disease, and those over 65 years old may be more susceptible to heat illnesses.

Prevention methods
Below are helpful reminders when working in heat and humidity.

  • Drink one glass (or equivalent) of water every 15 to 30 minutes worked, depending on conditions.
  • Take frequent breaks (five to 10 minutes per hour) to cool down and replenish.
  • Know how prescription drugs you take react to sun and heat exposure.
  • Avoid alcohol, caffeinated beverages, and non-prescribed drugs.
  • Build up tolerance to the heat (called acclimatization) by initially limiting the physical activity and exposure to the heat and gradually increasing these over a one- to two-week period.
  • Manage work activities and pair them to employees’ physical conditions. Adapt work and pace to the weather.
  • Use special protective gear (if available), such as cooling garments and cooling vests on “early entry” workers.
  • Know and review first-aid techniques for heat-related conditions.

There’s an app for that
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) have developed a smart phone app – the OSHA-NIOSH Heat Safety Tool – to assess heat stress risk where outdoor activities are planned. You can download it on the App Store or Google Play.

Take these safety steps whether mowing at work or home

By Kennedy Gardner, BWC Occupational Safety and Hygiene Fellow

In recent weeks, four Ohio workers suffered serious injuries while operating lawn mowers.

The injured workers included:

  • A 44-year-old male working in Massillon who died in a mower rollover.
  • A 21-year-old male working in North Canton who suffered multiple injuries in a mower rollover.
  • A 47-year-old male working in Cleveland who suffered multiple amputations from contact with a running mower blade.
  • A 75-year-old male in Chillicothe who suffered multiple injuries in a mower rollover.

Events like these are reminders of the dangers associated with lawn mowing. Whether you’re mowing for work or in your own yard, below are safety tips for operating either a push or riding lawn mower this summer.

Before using any type of lawn mower, make sure to read the instruction manual and ensure the mower is in good working order. Many injuries come from items being thrown from the spinning blades of the lawn mower. Before starting, clear the mowing area of potential flying objects such as:

  • Toys.
  • Stones.
  • Sticks and smaller tree limbs.
  • Trash and other debris.

Avoid running over any objects and steer clear of immovable objects (e.g., trees and large rocks). Also, users should always wear personal protective equipment, including hearing/eye protection and closed-toe shoes.

Another common injury from lawn mowers are cuts. These injuries often occur when sharp mower blades contact hands, feet or other body parts. It may seem like common sense, but never insert hands or feet into the mower or the discharge chute to remove grass or debris. Even if the lawnmower is turned off, the blades could still be spinning and cause a serious injury. Also, only use a mower that has protection from the hot and sharp parts of the equipment, and never remove these safety devices.

The risk of rollover increases when using a riding lawn mower on a hill or slope. When using a riding mower on a slope:

  • Make sure the roll over protection system (ROPS) is in place.
  • Never use a riding lawn mower on a slope greater than 15%.
  • Slow down and use caution when making turns and changing directions.
  • Never start or stop a riding mower when it is going uphill or downhill. Avoid all sudden starts, stops or turns.
  • If the tires lose traction, disengage the blades and proceed slowly straight down the slope.

Unfortunately, lawn mower accidents are the leading cause of amputations among children, with 600 of the 800 injuries involving children in the United States resulting in an amputation. The best way to avoid these horrific accidents is to keep children inside during mowing, and never let a child ride or sit on the lap of the mower operator. Also, keep pets inside when mowing the lawn as well to avoid unnecessary injuries or accidents.

Always keep safety as a priority and be cautious when mowing the lawn this summer. #summertimesafety