BWC to cover drug disposal bags for opioid prescriptions

By Miranda Williams, PharmD, RPh, Director of BWC’s Pharmacy Program

In our latest step to mitigate the opioid epidemic on Ohio’s workforce, we will provide injured workers with drug disposal bags that destroy leftover opioids.

Governor Mike DeWine, BWC Administrator/CEO Stephanie McCloud and RecoveryOhio Director Alisha Nelson announced this new statewide effort Thursday, Oct. 17, in Columbus at a local pharmacy.

You may view the announcement on BWC’s Facebook page. In addition, many media outlets attended the event. Here are some of the stories: Click here for WSYX-TV, ABC 6, in Columbus and here for the Statehouse News Bureau story.

Starting Nov. 1, retail pharmacies will automatically issue the disposal bags to Ohio injured workers receiving an opioid prescription for the first time within the last 12 months.

The bags destroy opioid pills, liquids, and patches in a chemical process rendering them useless.

Unused medications
“Newly injured workers don’t always need every opioid pill in their prescription, and this new effort will simplify the process for safely disposing of these dangerous drugs,” said Governor DeWine, who praised BWC for the initiative. “By giving these drug disposal bags to injured workers at the time they fill a prescription, we can not only educate them about the dangers of opioid addiction, but also reduce the risk that unused pills will end up where they shouldn’t – in the hands of children, for example.”

We’re covering the cost of every disposal bag, so there is no cost to the pharmacy, the injured worker, and the employer. “The bag is extremely simple to use and it’s completely biodegradable,” noted Administrator McCloud.

The bags destroy the drugs in a simple process, as Administrator McCloud and Governor DeWine demonstrated during the news conference:

  1. Toss any unused medication into the bag.
  2. Fill it with warm water and wait 30 seconds.
  3. Seal it and shake it. Throw the bag out.

“Along with the Governor’s RecoveryOhio initiative, we want to safeguard our community’s medicine cabinets from becoming gateways to youth and adult drug experimentation,” said Administrator McCloud.

Gov. DeWine and Administrator/CEO Stephanie McCloud demonstrate how to use the drug disposal bag.

Here’s a sobering statistic from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Nearly one-third of people ages 12 and over who used drugs for the first time began by using a prescription drug for non-medical purposes.

The disposal bags are one more tool in BWC’s comprehensive program to mitigate the opioid epidemic’s impact on Ohio’s workforce. Earlier this year, we dropped Oxycontin from our formulary and replaced it with opioids that have stronger abuse-deterrent technology.

We estimate up to 175 injured workers a month will be eligible for a drug disposal bag. That’s not a huge number — we covered 164,761 opioid prescriptions in calendar year 2018 — but if it saves one life, it’s worth doing. As Governor DeWine has often said, the opioid and substance-use epidemic is a complicated public health issue. There is no easy solution, and it requires all of us, from state leaders to you and our next-door neighbors, to fight this battle.

In addition, we are a leader in our industry. Other state agencies and workers’ comp systems across America look to us for guidance on a host of issues, from building strong pharmacy and safety programs to fighting fraud. Let’s hope they follow our lead on this effort, too.

For more information about drug disposal bags, email or call BWC’s Pharmacy Department at 877-543-6446,  8 a.m. – 4:45 p.m., EST, Monday – Friday.

Talk safety with us at the Farm Science Review

By Erik Harden, BWC Public Information Officer

With nearly 78,000 farms producing $9.3 billion in revenue, Ohio is one of the top five states in the U.S. for agriculture.

This robust industry remains a critical component of Ohio’s economy and one of the state’s major industries for employment. It’s also high-hazard work with great potential for workplace injuries and, unfortunately, even fatalities.

With all of this in mind, our Division of Safety & Hygiene (DSH) is once again promoting its programs and services at the Farm Science Review – one of the premier agricultural trade and education shows in the nation. Hosted by The Ohio State University, the event starts today and runs through Thursday at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center in London, Ohio.

For the fourth consecutive year, DSH representatives will be available at our booth to speak with attendees about the free programs and services we offer to assist employers and workers in Ohio’s agribusiness.

For example, our industrial hygienists can help farms guard against environmental hazards, including chemicals, pesticides, fertilizers, dust, mold, and extreme noise and temperatures.

Our ergonomists can illustrate ways to cut down on hazards resulting from:

  • Manual materials handling.
  • Repetitive, hand-intensive work.
  • Poor workstation design.
  • Sedentary work.

Our safety consultants can help prevent common but costly injuries to protect the bottom line of Ohio’s agriculture businesses and their workers.

If you’re going to Farm Science Review this week, stop by and see us! We’re booth No. 32 in Building 513.

Related links

 

Ten ways to take action for National Preparedness Month

Whether natural or man-made, disaster can strike at any time. Which is why it’s so important to be prepared.

Next week marks the beginning of National Preparedness Month, so it’s a great time to check on your planning – at home and in the workplace. Sponsored by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, this year’s theme is Prepared, Not Scared. Weekly themes cover everything from saving early for disaster costs to teaching children to be prepared.

From fires and floods to devastating tornadoes like those that touched down in Ohio earlier this year, there are simple steps you can take to be ready when disaster strikes. Below are some tips to help you and your workplace be more prepared and resilient.

  1. Sign up for local alerts and warnings, download apps, and check access for wireless emergency alerts.
  2. Create and practice emergency communication and action plans.
  3. Participate in a preparedness training or class.
  4. Learn lifesaving skills, such as CPR and first aid.
  5. Assemble or update emergency supplies, including flashlights, batteries, food, water, and medicine.
  6. Collect and safeguard critical documents, such as birth certificates and insurance policies.
  7. Document property and check your insurance policies for relevant hazards, such as flood, fire, and tornadoes.
  8. Consider the costs associated with disasters and save for emergencies.
  9. Make property improvements to reduce potential injury and property damage.
  10. Plan with neighbors to help each other and share resources.

Studies show that when employers urge workers to prepare for disasters, employees are 75% more likely to take preparedness actions.

Don’t wait until a disaster or emergency strikes. Take action now to protect yourself, your family and your workplace and be prepared for anything.

Ohio BWC honored to host national conference

Thank you to everyone who helped make it a success

By Kendra DePaul, BWC Other States Coverage Manager

Almost 500 workers’ comp professionals traveled to Cleveland the week of July 21 for the 2019 American Association of State Compensation Insurance Funds (AASCIF) Annual Conference. We are happy to report the conference was a resounding success!

A different state fund hosts the conference each year, and we had the honor of hosting this year. Our staff helped with planning and were on site at the conference to make sure everything went smoothly.

BWC Administrator/CEO Stephanie McCloud kicked off the event by welcoming guests to Ohio!

The best part of the conference was workers’ comp professionals coming together to share best practices and discuss our common issues. AASCIF has members from 26 states, plus eight workers’ comp boards in Canada.

This year, members of the Puerto Rico workers’ comp fund attended the conference. The combined experience and expertise in one place was unparalleled.

We had great keynote speakers, including several with Ohio ties. Brad Hurtig, who spoke about his journey after losing both of his hands in a devasting workplace accident. In addition, Sam Quinones – author of “Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic” – spoke about the deadly drug scourge plaguing our country.

There were also sessions on topics such as medical marijuana, customer service, the state of the economy, and national workers’ compensation issues.

When the annual communication award winners were announced, we were pleased to find ourselves in the winner’s circle among many of our peers including Pinnacol Assurance, Texas Mutual Insurance Company, Oregon’s State Accident Insurance Fund, California’s State Compensation Insurance Fund, Missouri Employers Mutual, Louisiana Workers’ Compensation Corporation, Minnesota’s State Fund Mutual Insurance Co., North Dakota Workforce Safety & Insurance, The Beacon Mutual Insurance Co. and Montana State Fund.

We accepted awards in the following categories:

  • Open Category: First Place for the 2019 Medical & Health Symposium.
  • Events: Second Place for the 2019 Ohio Safety Congress & Expo.
  • Excellence in Writing: Third Place for “Safety Pays for Columbus Brewery.”

In closing, we’d like to offer a huge THANK YOU to the AASCIF core team, sponsors, attendees, presenters and BWC ambassadors for making the 2019 AASCIF Annual Conference a success!

Next year, the Colorado state fund, Pinnacol Assurance, will host the conference in Denver. We’ll see you there!

Visit us at the Ohio State Fair!

Stop by our booth to learn about our safety and wellness programs  

Hello from the 2019 Ohio State Fair! We’re in the Bricker Marketplace – booth 02 to be exact – and we’re excited to share how we’ve got you covered!

At work – Our safety services make workplaces and jobs safer; we’re also here if you get hurt on the job.

Your health and wellness – We’re keeping Ohioans healthy with wellness initiatives like Better You, Better Ohio!®

On and off the clock – A lot of safe practices overlap between work and home. Recognizing hazards is the first step to avoiding them.

Stop by our booth to learn more! Stick around to play safety plinko, get a photo, or check your eligibility for our Better You, Better Ohio! wellness program.

We’re honored to be part of this traditional event for Ohioans and one of the largest state fairs in the nation.

We hope to see you there!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12 fireworks safety tips for a celebratory Fourth of July

The Fourth of July is an exciting time for friends and family to gather and celebrate America.

While most Independence Days are filled with fireworks, cookouts and parades, this holiday can also be one of the most dangerous.

On average, 280 people visit the emergency room every day around July 4th with fireworks-related injuries. According to the National Fire Protection Association, more fires are reported on July 4 than any other day of the year. On average, fireworks cause 1,300 structure fires, 300 vehicle fires and nearly 17,000 other fires resulting in injury each year.

The National Safety Council strongly advises leaving fireworks to the professionals and staying away from all consumer fireworks. However, if you are planning to set off your own fireworks this Fourth of July, below are some essential tips to keep your friends and family safe:

  1. Make sure setting off your own fireworks is legal in your area before you buy or ignite any fireworks.
  2. Make sure you have a large open area in which to set off your fireworks that is free of tree branches or power lines. Never light fireworks indoors or near people or animals.
  3. When purchasing your fireworks, avoid ones that are packaged in brown paper – those are typically made for professional displays and should not be used by amateurs.
  4. Never allow young children to play with or ignite fireworks; always ensure anyone under the age of 18 is accompanied by an adult when setting off fireworks.
  5. When lighting your fireworks, do not place any part of your body directly over the fireworks. Also, back up to a safe distance immediately upon lighting, and never light more than one firework at a time.
  6. If a firework has not been fully ignited, do not pick it up or try to re-light it.
  7. Never point or throw a firework at another person or animal.
  8. Be sure to keep a hose, bucket of water or fire extinguisher close by.
  9. Do not put fireworks in your pockets.
  10. Never shoot off fireworks from glass or metal containers.
  11. Once your fireworks have been ignited and set off, pour a bucket of water over the top before moving, handling or throwing the remains away.
  12. Remember that sparklers are also fireworks and should be handled carefully.

The above rules of thumb should be followed for any type of firework.

Celebrate responsibility this Fourth of July and follow the above safety tips when setting off any size firework.

An even better idea is to head to your local park with a blanket and some snacks and enjoy your area’s professional fireworks show!

Be Safe Ohio!

BWC, ODJFS: Online training to help injured workers

OhioMeansJobs webinars available for continuing education credit

By Tina Elliott, Director, BWC Return to Work Services

To help Ohio’s injured workers return to work, we’re continuing our partnership with the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) through its OhioMeansJobs.com website.

A recording of our joint training series with ODJFS is now available online.

These webinars were designed to help providers, injured workers, BWC staff and managed care organizations better understand the resources available to help injured workers return to work. We also want people to know the OhioMeansJobs website can be used as a one-stop hub for return-to-work services.

To view the webinars, go to BWC Learning Management System and select Login or Need an Account. Once you log in, search for the following:

  • Adding Value for Job Seekers with LMI and OhioMeansJobs.com: Locating Information
  • Adding Value for Job Seekers with LMI and OhioMeansJobs.com: Career Direction and ExplorationContinuing Education

Each one-hour session offers one continuing education unit (CEU) for certified rehabilitation counselors, certified case managers and certified disability management specialists. This CEU credit is only valid through Aug. 19.

Session survey

If you already attended the live sessions, you’re welcome to review the videos and access the handouts as a refresher. However, you won’t earn new CEUs for retaking the same sessions. You must complete the session survey to obtain a certificate and credit for the CEUs.

Once you complete the course and the survey, your CEU information will be in your BWC learning center transcript. Within a few days, your certificate will also be available online.

If you have questions, please email us. Thank you for learning more about the tools and resources available on OhioMeansJobs.com. Together, we’re helping Ohio’s injured workers return to work and return to life.