Acclimatization and Other Tips to Avoid Heat Illness

By Rich Gaul, Safety Technical Advisor

With summer just around the corner, now is the time to learn about heat illness so you can take the proper precautions. Almost 50% of heat-related deaths occur on a worker’s first day on the job and over 70% occur during a worker’s first week.* High school and college students starting new summer jobs, like landscaping, are at high risk because they may work 8-12 hours per day in the heat.

In an earlier blog, we discussed the signs and symptoms of heat illness. Now we’ll talk about preparing for the heat. Prior to beginning any strenuous physical work or recreational activity, it is important to prepare your body by warming up slowly. Preparing for strenuous activities in the hot summer months is no different.

One of the most important and often overlooked heat illness prevention strategies is called acclimatization. This involves slow and gradual increases to heat exposure over a period of 7 to 14 days. Physiological adaptations occur in the human body during that time period that increase tolerance of heat exposure. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommends 20% exposure on day one, with 20% increase in exposure each additional day. Acclimatizing periods are particularly important for new employees and those returning from extended leaves of absence. Employers should have acclimatization plans in place now to help prepare their employees for heat exposure.

A NIOSH study of heat-related illnesses and death found that in most cases, the employers had no program to prevent heat illness, or their programs were deficient. Acclimatization was the program element most commonly missing and most directly associated with worker death.

We all look forward to enjoying the summer months, but it’s important to take the proper precautions. Whether you work in a hot environment or just enjoy summer recreational activities, slow and gradual exposure to heat over a period of several days or weeks will help your body acclimatize.

In addition to acclimatization, following the simple guidelines below will also help prevent heat-related illnesses. 

Other tips to avoid heat illness:

  • Take frequent breaks in shaded areas or air conditioning.
  • Drink plenty of water throughout the day (eight ounces every 15-20 minutes).
  • Avoid direct sunlight to minimize heat load and harmful UV rays.
  • Wear light-colored, light weight, loose clothing that provides natural ventilation.
  • Perform strenuous work in the morning or late afternoon when temperatures are cooler.
  • Know the early warning signs and symptoms of heat illness and seek help when needed.
  • Plan for and know what to do in an emergency.

Use the information in this two-part blog series to prevent heat illness so you can enjoy summer safely. For additional information about heat illness prevention, attend BWC’s virtual training class on Thermal Stress on June 9, 2021 or read BWC’s Heat Stress Safety Talk. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA’s) website provides workers and employers with additional information and resources on heat illnesses and how to prevent it, including heat stress prevention QuickCards available in both English and Spanish. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health also has information on preventing heat-related illness at work in its May 7, 2021 blog.

*Source: OSHA, Heat: Prevention: Protecting New Workers


Prevent electrical injuries during Electrical Safety Month

By Michael Marr, Safety Technical Resource Consultant

Since May is National Electrical Safety Month, we want to share information about electrical safety for Ohio employers as well as some resources to keep Ohio’s workers safe.

National Electrical Safety Month is sponsored by the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFi) to remind the public of the hazards associated with electricity. Each May, ESFi spearheads an annual campaign to educate key audiences about ways to reduce the number of electrically related fires, fatalities, injuries, and property loss. This year’s theme “Connected to Safety,” delves into the emerging technology that makes a home safe and efficient. ESFi has shared the following resources for 2021:

Electrical safety is also important to understand in the workplace. In 2019, there were 166 fatalities and 1,900 injuries requiring days away from work from electrical contacts across the United States. There were three electrocutions in Ohio last year, an increase from previous years. Electrical injuries occur in a wide variety of occupations, but as this chart shows the majority happen in construction and maintenance.

BWC’s Division of Safety and Hygiene (DSH) offers a variety of resources to help employers improve electrical safety in their workplaces.  

Educational Courses: You can register for these courses and more on the BWC Learning Center.

Safety Talks: Safety Talks are intended as a training resource to increase safety awareness and improve performance. Employers can use them to start conversations about safety. The following Safety Talks about electricity and lockout/tagout are available on our website:

If you have questions about electrical safety, BWC is here to help. Reach out to one of our BWC safety consultants online for assistance or call 1-800-644-6292. Don’t forget take advantage of our other safety services as well. DSH offers a wide range of services for all industries at no additional cost to employers including safety consultations, safety education and training, and the BWC safety and video library.

Identify the signs and symptoms of Heat Illness

By Rich Gaul, Safety Technical Advisor

What do constructions workers, school kitchen workers, and the high school students mowing your lawn all have in common? They could potentially be at risk for heat illness, and they should take appropriate precautions.

With the warm summer months fast approaching, employers and their workers must protect themselves from the dangers of heat illness. Although we typically associate heat illness with outdoor work, any worker exposed to hot and humid conditions, whether outdoors or indoors, is at risk of heat illness. And, heat illness is not just a work-related problem. Exertional heat stroke is the second leading cause of death among athletes.

Heat illness occurs when heat builds up in the body faster than the body can cool itself. Heat-related illnesses may include heat rash, heat cramps, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke. Heat stroke is very serious because it requires immediate medical attention and can lead to death if left untreated. The progression of these stages of illness can be gradual or very rapid.

Symptoms of heat illness:

  • Dizziness.
  • Headache.
  • Muscle cramps.
  • Extreme sweating.
  • Fainting.
  • Nausea.
  • Vomiting.
  • Weakness.

If you begin to experience heat-related symptoms, you should:

  • Notify someone you are experiencing heat illness symptoms and have them summon help.
  • Find a cool place to lay down, rest, and elevate your feet.
  • Drink plenty of water to rehydrate.
  • Loosen or remove as much clothing as possible.
  • Place cold wet towels around your neck, under your armpits, and across your chest.
  • Seek medical attention if you do not feel better within 30 minutes.

If you observe someone experiencing symptoms of heat stroke (confusion, slurred speech, seizures, very high body temperature, rapid heart rate, unconsciousness) call 911 immediately. When in doubt, call 911. Heat-related illnesses may appear less severe than they really are.

For additional information about heat illness prevention, attend BWC’s virtual training class on Thermal Stress on June 9, 2021 or read BWC’s Heat Stress Safety Talk. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s website provides workers and employers with additional information and resources on heat illnesses and how to prevent it, including heat stress prevention QuickCards available in both English and Spanish. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health also has information on preventing heat-related illness at work in its May 7, 2021 blog.

Workers’ comp fraud lands cheaters costly penalties

Convicts include Central Ohio doc ordered to pay $71K to BWC

Four Ohioans convicted or sentenced for workers’ compensation fraud in April include a Central Ohio physician who unlawfully distributed controlled substances and overbilled the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC).

On April 15, U.S. Judge Michael Wilson of the Southern District of Ohio ordered Kedar Deshpande, MD, to pay $117,122 in restitution, including $70,957 to BWC. The judge also sentenced Deshpande to three years of supervised release, 12 months of which is to be served under home detention, for felony counts of unlawful distribution of controlled substances and false statements relating to health care matters.

“Our Special Investigations Department found Dr. Deshpande upcoded patient office visits by falsely representing the level of examination he performed on our injured workers so he could receive inflated reimbursement from BWC,” said BWC Interim Administrator/CEO John Logue. “Congratulations to our investigators for their work on this important case and for bringing three other fraud cases to a close last month.”

Deshpande is the former owner and operator of the now-closed Orthopaedic & Spine Center, which had three locations in Central Ohio. A multi-jurisdictional task force of state and federal authorities found Deshpande pre-signed blank prescriptions for unqualified and non-licensed staff to complete and dispense to patients in his absence. The staff would fill-in the prescriptions with Schedule II controlled substances before dispensing to patients. The staff would mostly dispense the pre-signed prescriptions when Deshpande was on vacation, arrived late to the office, or was otherwise not at the clinic.

Other April fraud cases include:

William Knox of Athens, Ohio

Knox pleaded guilty April 7 in the Franklin County Common Pleas Court to one count of workers’ compensation fraud and one count of forgery, both fourth-degree felonies. Knox was sentenced to community control for five years and ordered to pay BWC restitution of $131,752.

BWC investigators found Knox inflated his weekly income from his employer of record so he could be paid at a higher weekly rate of compensation from BWC.

Tanya Houston of Shaker Heights, Ohio

A Franklin County judge ordered Houston to pay $23,489 to BWC and serve five years of probation in lieu of a one-year prison sentence after she pleaded guilty to a fifth-degree felony count of workers’ compensation fraud on April 7. BWC discovered Houston working while collecting injured-worker benefits.

Frank Phillips of Hamilton, Ohio

Phillips pleaded guilty April 26 in Franklin County to one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a fifth-degree felony, for working while receiving BWC disability benefits. He was ordered to pay BWC $12,588 in restitution and serve five years on community control.

To report suspected workers’ compensation fraud, call 1-800-644-6292 or visit bwc.ohio.gov.