Memorial Day

A Day to Remember and Honor

By Judi Grant, BWC Electronic Design Specialist

Memorial Day is a day to honor the men and women who have died while serving in the United States Armed Forces.

One special veteran always comes to mind – my grandfather, Raymond Harley Petty. I honor his memory on this day, and I think about all the veterans who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our country.

Although we never met, I carry the impression my grandfather left on my family — respect and love for country, and service to it.

Grandpa enlisted in the Army March 26, 1943, in Columbus. He was 27 and married to my maternal grandmother, Millie.

Pvt. Petty was assigned to the 823rd Tank Destroyer Battalion, which shipped out from Boston on April 6, 1944. His battalion arrived in England on April 17, 1944, then landed at Omaha Beach in Normandy, France, just weeks after D-Day. From there, all my family knew was that my grandfather died from wounds suffered in Germany.

I had searched for years for details on his death. All my inquiries ended the same way, “I’m sorry, all records were burnt in a fire.” In 2019, my father-in-law, Don Grant, a veteran himself, found the answers I was seeking.

We learned my grandfather’s war wounds cost him his left leg, and he died of a blood clot on Nov. 16, 1944 in a hospital in Cambridge, England. Before passing, he received the Purple Heart.

Seven days later, my mother, also named Millie, turned 1. My grandfather had seen pictures of her, but the two never met.

For four years, my grandfather’s remains lay in a beautiful U.S. Military Cemetery in Cambridge, 42 miles northeast of London. In 1948, the Army moved his remains to his final resting place in Beckett Cemetery in Commercial Point, Ohio, about 25 minutes south of downtown Columbus in Pickaway County.

Thanks to my father-in-law’s research, we learned Grandpa was eligible for more than the Purple Heart. In 2018, we received four additional medals, including the Presidential Unit Citation.

I was so proud I immediately framed the medals and other mementoes in a shadow box that hangs in my home office.

Still, something was missing.

I’ve been saddened over the years that I never had a picture of my grandparents and mother together. But that changed last year. On my mother’s birthday, I was looking through old photos and discovered one I had never seen —my grandfather, dressed in full military uniform, standing close to my grandma, who was pregnant with my mother at the time.

I found what I needed.

I am beyond grateful for my grandfather’s sacrifice and that of so many others. On this Memorial Day, as I always do, I’ll ache for the life cut short, the young man who never held his only child, the father my mother never knew. But I will celebrate his life, too.

Thank you, Grandpa.

Military details courtesy of www.tankdestroyer.net.

BWC nurse battles COVID-19 on front lines

May is National Nurses Month. BWC nurse tells her story.

By Jennifer Wolford RN, Medical Service Specialist, Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation

Away from my BWC job as a medical service specialist, I work as an intermittent nurse in an emergency department (ED) at an Akron-area hospital on weekends. Since the community spread of COVID-19 began, being an ED nurse means the odds of being exposed again and again to this virus are virtually guaranteed.

BWC nurse Jennifer Wolford, RN, works on weekends in the emergency department at an Akron-area hospital.

My colleagues and I can’t see this invisible killer, of course, but we see its impact on our patients and on each other. Not just the physical symptoms, but the fear — you can see it on their faces, you can feel it. We’ve watched patients die from this disease.

I wear a face mask and face shield for my entire 12-hour shift to protect myself and my co-workers. After my shift ends, I cover my car seat with a towel and wipe down my door handles, steering wheel, and other parts with Clorox wipes. When I come home, I immediately put my clothes into the washing machine on sanitize. I use a Clorox wipe to clean anything I touched.

After I shower, I again sanitize everything I touched. I keep a safe distance from my family. Basically, I treat myself as though I actually have COVID-19 because we know people with the disease might have it for days and weeks without showing any symptoms.

This is my life. I have a son with multiple disabilities; I can’t take any risks. Until there is a vaccine, my reality looks a lot different – this is my new normal.

Respect the virus

This is everybody’s new normal, actually. That’s why I support Governor Mike DeWine’s encouragement for all of us to wear a face mask in public where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain. You may believe you don’t have the virus, or you may feel silly wearing a mask, but none of us is safe from this disease.

Case in point: My family has a friend who is just 58 and otherwise healthy, no co-morbidities. He had the coronavirus and was on a ventilator for nearly three weeks. Thankfully, he is recovering now. Unlike my friend’s mom, my ex-husband’s stepfather, and perhaps someone you know, too.

A colleague asked me the other day, “You work at BWC now, why put yourself at risk working in an emergency department, especially these days?”

I’m a nurse, I told him. It’s what we do.

The American Nurses Association promotes May as Nurses Month to support and recognize nurses for their contributions in crises and for their ongoing roles in meeting the needs of patients and their communities.

May 2020: Celebrate National Nurses Month and Year of the Nurse

By Mary Charney, BSN, RN, BBA, Director of Nursing

Nurses are heroes. Nurses make a difference.

Not just in these challenging times during our battle with the coronavirus (COVID-19), but in our everyday lives and those of Ohio’s injured workers. The value that nurses contribute to health care and their role in society is why our nation is celebrating National Nurses Month in May during the International Year of the Nurse and Midwife 2020.

This well-deserved recognition honors the 200th anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s birthday on May 12. She founded our modern nursing profession.

BWC’s nurses lead at work, home

The value nurses bring to our customers goes way beyond the bedside. While most of BWC’s 61 nurses do not see patients face-to-face every day, they greatly impact Ohio’s injured workers, employers, and their coworkers’ lives. They work in a variety of areas, from medical policy, legal, and employee health to rehabilitation, claims management, compliance, and clinical advisement.

Many of our nurses serve as a medical resource to answer questions from Ohio’s injured workers, providers, managed care organizations, and their coworkers. Others are serving their local communities by working in a hospital emergency department or by making personal protective equipment. Many are assisting their families, friends, and communities with health issues and serving as their advocates.

We, along with the rest of the nation, devote this month and this year to highlighting the diverse ways registered nurses work to improve health care. In honor of National Nurses Month and the Year of the Nurse, thank our nursing professionals for what he or she does every day at work and within our communities. Nurses make a difference by excelling, leading, and innovating for us throughout our lives.


Largest, most trusted health-care profession

In an 18-year running streak, Americans rated nurses as the No. 1 most ethical and honest profession, according to the most recent Gallup poll. This is another reason to celebrate nurses during the Year of the Nurse and it also shines a light on the nursing profession.

The American Nursing Association states that now more than ever, we need to support and recognize nurses for their contributions in crises and for their ongoing roles in meeting the needs of patients and their communities. In these challenging times, we encourage you to promote nurses’ health and well-being and to honor them in every way you can.

Thank you, nurses!

Every nurse has a heart-felt story to tell of how he or she has helped someone during their varied careers. Every day, BWC’s nurses strive to serve as the best resource and provide exemplary service for Ohio’s injured workers and our employees.

BWC’s nurses use their knowledge, talents, dedication to service, and compassion to assist others. I have never reached out to a nurse asking for help with a project or with a workers’ comp claim issue and not received this quick response – “Of course, I will help.”

Here is one of my favorite quotes by Maya Angelou: “As a nurse, we have the opportunity to heal the heart, mind, soul and body of our patients, their families, and ourselves. They may not remember your name, but they will never forget the way you made them feel.”

Take time to thank a nurse today to let them know how much you appreciate their efforts to go above and beyond for all of us. We honor our nurses during National Nurses Month for their hard work and service all year long!

They are truly heroes without capes.

The American Nurses Association promotes May as Nurses Month to support and recognize nurses for their contributions in crises and for their ongoing roles in meeting the needs of patients and their communities.