Coping with pain

‘Visualize your way out of it,’ psychologist tells work comp audience

By Tony Gottschlich, BWC Public Information Officer

There’s another way to deal with chronic pain that doesn’t involve medications or surgery, a psychologist told an audience Friday at the 2017 Ohio Workers’ Compensation Medical & Health Symposium.

It’s called Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and it’s not as complicated as it sounds. In fact, the techniques are rather simple, said Michael Coupland, medical director for Integrated Medical Case Solutions in West Palm Beach, Florida.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a widely accepted form of psychotherapy that is based on the cognitive model: the way that individuals perceive a situation is more closely connected to their reaction than the situation itself.

Coupland explained that we can condition our brains to control pain or banish it from our consciousness. But it takes practice, a daily repetition of mantras, deep breathing techniques, meditation and other mindfulness methods for it to take root and stick.

Thanks to neuroplasticity, the brain can reorganize or rewire itself, both physically and functionally, throughout your life in response to your environment, behavior, thinking and emotions.

“Exercise your neurons, visualize your way out of this,” he said. “I tell my patients, ‘Whether you believe in this or not, just humor me and do this every day for eight weeks.’ These techniques help stand down the body’s stress-arousal system.”

Coupland admitted it’s tough for most patients to accept this approach. Mindfulness, a state of active, open awareness of the present moment, and meditation are about “letting go,” but the American educational system teaches us to “hold on” to everything we learn.

Coupland shared with the audience a book he authored in the style of Dr. Seuss that illustrates the simplicity and effectiveness of CBT. It’s titled, “Up Pain, Down Pain, Good Brain, Bad Brain,” and can be found for free here.

For more on Coupland and his work, visit www.icms.us or www.cope-with-pain.com.

One thought on “Coping with pain

  1. Pingback: Provider perspective: Ohio Workers’ Compensation Medical & Health Symposium in photos | BWC Blog

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